Energy expenditure in children aged 1.5 to 4.5 years: a comparison with current aged 1.5-4.5 years with current recommendations for energy intake

Davies, P.S.W., Gregory, J. and White, A. (1995) Energy expenditure in children aged 1.5 to 4.5 years: a comparison with current aged 1.5-4.5 years with current recommendations for energy intake. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 49 5: 360-364.


Author Davies, P.S.W.
Gregory, J.
White, A.
Title Energy expenditure in children aged 1.5 to 4.5 years: a comparison with current aged 1.5-4.5 years with current recommendations for energy intake
Journal name European Journal of Clinical Nutrition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0954-3007
Publication date 1995-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 49
Issue 5
Start page 360
End page 364
Total pages 5
Place of publication London, England
Publisher Nature Publishing
Language eng
Subject 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To compare measurements of total energy expenditure in children aged 1.5-4.5 years with current recommendations for energy intake.

Design:
Total energy expenditure was measured using the doubly labelled water technique and compared with 1991 UK recommendations for energy intake.

Setting:
Community-based study in East Anglia and South East: England.

Subjects:

Ninety-three children aged 1.5-4.5 years recruited. Results available on 81 children.

Results:

Mean values for total energy expenditure for the boys were 359, 341 and 327 kJ/kg in the age groups 1.5-2.5, 2.5-3.5 and 3.5-4.5 years respectively. In the girls, mean values for total energy expenditure were 347, 317 and 310 kJ/kg in the age groups 1.5-2.5, 2.5-3.5 and 3.5-4.5 respectively. These values were approximately 12% and 10% below current recommendations for energy intake in girls and boys respectively.

Conclusions:
These data add to the growing literature that indicate that energy expenditure in young children is significantly below previous estimates. Secular changes in habitual levels of physical activity might be responsible for reduced levels of physical activity.
Keyword Doubly-labeled-water
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 25 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 08 Sep 2010, 09:33:17 EST