Zoonotic disease in Australia caused by a novel member of the paramyxoviridae

Paterson, DL, Murray, PK and McCormack, JG (1998) Zoonotic disease in Australia caused by a novel member of the paramyxoviridae. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 27 1: 112-118. doi:10.1086/514614

Author Paterson, DL
Murray, PK
McCormack, JG
Title Zoonotic disease in Australia caused by a novel member of the paramyxoviridae
Journal name Clinical Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1058-4838
Publication date 1998-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1086/514614
Volume 27
Issue 1
Start page 112
End page 118
Total pages 7
Place of publication Chicago, I.L., U.S.A.
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract Twenty-three horses and three humans in Queensland, Australia, were infected with a novel member of the Paramyxoviridae family of viruses in two geographically distinct outbreaks. Two of the humans died-one died of rapid- onset respiratory illness, and the other died of encephalitis. The third infected human developed an influenza-like illness and made a complete recovery. All infected humans had close contact with sick horses. Since the two outbreaks occurred at sites 1,000 km apart and no known contact between the two groups of humans and horses occurred, extensive testing of animals and birds common to the two areas was conducted. Fruit bats (Pteropus species) were found to carry a virus identical to that found in the infected humans and horses. Although there was no contact between the infected humans and the bats, some form of close contact between the horses and bats is the likely mode of infection.
Keyword Equine Morbillivirus Infection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
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Created: Tue, 07 Sep 2010, 17:07:54 EST