Latitudinal variability in spatial genetic structure in the invasive ascidian, Styela plicata

David, Gwendolyn K., Marshall, Dustin J. and Riginos, Cynthia (2010) Latitudinal variability in spatial genetic structure in the invasive ascidian, Styela plicata. Marine Biology, 157 9: 1955-1965. doi:10.1007/s00227-010-1464-y


Author David, Gwendolyn K.
Marshall, Dustin J.
Riginos, Cynthia
Title Latitudinal variability in spatial genetic structure in the invasive ascidian, Styela plicata
Formatted title
Latitudinal variability in spatial genetic structure in the invasive ascidian, Styela plicata
Journal name Marine Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0025-3162
1432-1793
Publication date 2010-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00227-010-1464-y
Volume 157
Issue 9
Start page 1955
End page 1965
Total pages 11
Editor Ulrich Sommer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
Formatted abstract
Increases in temperature can shorten planktonic larval durations, so that higher temperatures may reduce dispersal distances for many marine animals. To test this prediction, we first quantified how minimum time to settlement is shortened at higher temperatures for the ascidian Styela plicata. Second, using latitude as a correlate for ocean temperature and spatial genetic structure as a proxy for dispersal, we tested for a negative correlation between latitude and spatial genetic structure within populations, as measured by anonymous DNA markers. Spatial genetic structure was variable among latitudes, with significant structure at low and intermediate latitudes (high and medium temperatures) and there was no genetic structure within high-latitude (low temperature) populations. In addition, we found consistently high genetic diversity across all Australian populations, showing no evidence for recent local bottlenecks associated S. plicata’s history as an invasive species. There was, however, significant genetic differentiation between all populations indicating limited ongoing gene flow.
© 2010 Springer-Verlag

Keyword Multilocus genotype data
Marine invertebrate larvae
Population-structure
Reef fishes
Autocorrelation analysis
Delayed metamorphosis
Botryllus-Schlosseri
Species invasions
Clava tunicata
Life-history
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 05 Sep 2010, 00:03:47 EST