The effects of a woman-focused, woman-held resource on preventive health behaviors during pregnancy: The Pregnancy Pocketbook

Wilkinson, Shelley A., Miller, Yvette D. and Watson, Bernadette (2010) The effects of a woman-focused, woman-held resource on preventive health behaviors during pregnancy: The Pregnancy Pocketbook. Women and Health, 50 4: 342-358. doi:10.1080/03630242.2010.498756

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Author Wilkinson, Shelley A.
Miller, Yvette D.
Watson, Bernadette
Title The effects of a woman-focused, woman-held resource on preventive health behaviors during pregnancy: The Pregnancy Pocketbook
Journal name Women and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0363-0242
1541-0331
Publication date 2010-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/03630242.2010.498756
Open Access Status
Volume 50
Issue 4
Start page 342
End page 358
Total pages 17
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
We evaluated the effectiveness of a woman-held pregnancy record ('The Pregnancy Pocketbook') on improving health behaviors important for maternal and infant health. The Pregnancy Pocketbook was developed as a woman-focused preventive approach to pregnancy health based on antenatal management guidelines, behavior-change evidence, and formative research with the target population and health service providers. The Pregnancy Pocket book was evaluated using a quasi-experimental, two-group design; one clinic cohort received the Pregnancy Pocketbook (n = 163); the other received Usual Care (n = 141). Smoking, fruit and vegetable intake, and physical activity were assessed at baseline (service-entry) and 12-weeks. Approximately two-thirds of women in the Pregnancy Pocketbook clinic recalled receiving the resource. A small, but significantly greater proportion of women at the Pregnancy Pocketbook site (7.6%) than the UC site (2.1%) quit smoking. No significant effect was observed of the Pregnancy Pocketbook on fruit and vegetable intake or physical activity. Few women completed sections that required health professional assistance. The Pregnancy Pocketbook produced small, but significant effects on smoking cessation, despite findings that indicate minimal interaction about the resource between health staff and the women in their care. A refocus of antenatal care toward primary prevention is required to provide essential health information and behavior change tools more consistently for improved maternal and infant health outcomes. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Keyword Antenatal
Behavior change
Nutrition
Fruit
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 05 Sep 2010, 00:00:06 EST