The privileged place of home: Place, memory and the disease of nostalgia

Sully, Nicole (2002). The privileged place of home: Place, memory and the disease of nostalgia. In: Additions to architectural history : nineteenth annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Brisbane, Australia. Additions to architectural history: XIXth conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Brisbane, Australia, (60-60). 4-7 October 2002.

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Author Sully, Nicole
Title of paper The privileged place of home: Place, memory and the disease of nostalgia
Conference name Additions to architectural history: XIXth conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 4-7 October 2002
Proceedings title Additions to architectural history : nineteenth annual conference of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, Brisbane, Australia
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand
Publication Year 2002
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 1864996471
9781864996470
Start page 60
End page 60
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In the centuries prior to the advent of printing, scholars who practised the ars memorativa, often undertook travel specifically in order to expand their repertoires of backgrounds for their memory palaces. Thus the act of travelling became associated with not just the pursuit of knowledge and experience, but also with memory. However, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries this association with memory and travel was tragically inverted with the rising incidence of a much feared disease, known as Nostalgia. Nostalgia was a sometimes fatal bout of homesickness, a form of melancholia, which was essentially a disease of both memory and place, which while now dismissed as psychosomatic, or merely ‘nervous humours’, was surrounded with such trepidation that impending travellers went so far as to avoid prolonged absences from home in fear of contracting the disease. This paper will investigate the relationship between travel and memory as expressed through the disease of nostalgia. Tracing the disease from its seventeenth century origins through to its twentieth century transformation from ‘disease’ to ‘sentiment’, this paper will draw from the thought of Gaston Bachelard and the films of Andrey Tarkovsky to argue that the disease of nostalgia was a pathological connection to place, which, through memory, idealised and problematised one’s connection to home.
Subjects 120103 Architectural History and Theory
Keyword Nostalgia
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Description: 93 p. : ill. ; 21 cm. + CD-ROM entitled: Additions XIX SAHANZ, Brisbane 2002.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: ATCH (Architecture Theory History Criticism) Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 30 Aug 2010, 13:51:24 EST by Mr Andrew Steen on behalf of School of Architecture