Causes and consequences of variation in plant population growth rate: a synthesis of matrix population models in a phylogenetic context

Buckley, Yvonne M., Ramula, Satu, Blomberg, Simon. P., Burns, Jean H., Crone, Elizabeth E., Herlen, Johan, Knight, Tiffany M., Pichancourt, Jean-Baptiste, Quested, Helen and Wardle, Glenda M. (2010) Causes and consequences of variation in plant population growth rate: a synthesis of matrix population models in a phylogenetic context. Ecology Letters, 13 9: 1182-1197. doi:10.1111/j.1461-0248.2010.01506.x

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Author Buckley, Yvonne M.
Ramula, Satu
Blomberg, Simon. P.
Burns, Jean H.
Crone, Elizabeth E.
Herlen, Johan
Knight, Tiffany M.
Pichancourt, Jean-Baptiste
Quested, Helen
Wardle, Glenda M.
Title Causes and consequences of variation in plant population growth rate: a synthesis of matrix population models in a phylogenetic context
Journal name Ecology Letters   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1461-023X
1461-0248
Publication date 2010-09
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2010.01506.x
Volume 13
Issue 9
Start page 1182
End page 1197
Total pages 16
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject C1
960603 Environmental Lifecycle Assessment
060207 Population Ecology
Formatted abstract
Explaining variation in population growth rates is fundamental to predicting population dynamics and population responses to environmental change. In this study, we used matrix population models, which link birth, growth and survival to population growth rate, to examine how and why population growth rates vary within and among 50 terrestrial plant species. Population growth rates were more similar within species than among species; with phylogeny having a minimal influence on among-species variation. Most population growth rates decreased over the observation period and were negatively autocorrelated between years; that is, higher than average population growth rates tended to be followed by lower than average population growth rates. Population growth rates varied more through time than space; this temporal variation was due mostly to variation in post-seedling survival and for a subset of species was partly explained by response to environmental factors, such as fire and herbivory. Stochastic population growth rates departed from mean matrix population growth rate for temporally autocorrelated environments. Our findings indicate that demographic data and models of closely related plant species cannot necessarily be used to make recommendations for conservation or control, and that post-seedling survival and the sequence of environmental conditions are critical for determining plant population growth rate.
Keyword Comparative Analysis
Demography
Fire
Herbivory
Matrix population models
MCMCglmm
Population dynamics
Population growth rate
Temporal autocorrelation
Spatial and temporal variation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 34 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 25 Aug 2010, 14:34:43 EST by Joni Taylor on behalf of School of Biological Sciences