Attention modulates motor system activation during action observation: Evidence for inhibitory rebound

Schuch, Stefanie, Bayliss, Andrew P., Klein, Christoph and Tipper, Steven P. (2010) Attention modulates motor system activation during action observation: Evidence for inhibitory rebound. Experimental Brain Research, 205 2: 235-249. doi:10.1007/s00221-010-2358-4

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Author Schuch, Stefanie
Bayliss, Andrew P.
Klein, Christoph
Tipper, Steven P.
Title Attention modulates motor system activation during action observation: Evidence for inhibitory rebound
Journal name Experimental Brain Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-4819
1432-1106
Publication date 2010-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00221-010-2358-4
Volume 205
Issue 2
Start page 235
End page 249
Total pages 15
Editor John C. Rothwell
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Perceiving another individual's actions activates the human motor system. We investigated whether this effect is stronger when the observed action is relevant to the observer's task. The mu rhythm (oscillatory activity in the 8- to 13-Hz band over sensorimotor cortex) was measured while participants watched videos of grasping movements. In one of two conditions, the participants had to later report how many times they had seen a certain kind of grasp. In the other condition, they viewed the identical videos but had to later report how many times they had seen a certain colour change. The colour change and the grasp always occurred simultaneously. Results show mu rhythm attenuation when watching the videos relative to baseline. This attenuation was stronger when participants later reported the grasp rather than the colour, suggesting that the motor system is more strongly activated when the observed grasping actions were relevant to the observer's task. Moreover, when the graspable object disappeared after the offset of the video, there was subsequent mu rhythm enhancement, reflecting a post-stimulus inhibitory rebound. This enhancement was again stronger when making judgments about the grasp than the colour, suggesting that the stronger activation is followed by a stronger inhibitory rebound.
© 2010 The Author(s).
Keyword Action perception
Inhibition
Mirror system
Mu rhythm
EEG
Mu-rhythm
Cortical excitability
Utilization behavior
Human brain
Perception
Imitation
Mirror
Cortex
Humans
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 22 Aug 2010, 00:08:58 EST