Experimental and modelling studies of drought-adaptive root architectural traits in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

ManschadiAM, Christopher, J.T., HammerGL and DevoilP (2010). Experimental and modelling studies of drought-adaptive root architectural traits in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). In: RootRAP 2009. 7th Symposium of the International Society of Root Research, Vienna, Austria, (458-462). 2-4 September, 2009. doi:10.1080/11263501003731805

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Author ManschadiAM
Christopher, J.T.
HammerGL
DevoilP
Title of paper Experimental and modelling studies of drought-adaptive root architectural traits in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)
Conference name 7th Symposium of the International Society of Root Research
Conference location Vienna, Austria
Conference dates 2-4 September, 2009
Proceedings title RootRAP 2009   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Plant Biosystems   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Bologna, Italy
Publisher Editrice compositori
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1080/11263501003731805
Open Access Status
ISSN 1126-3504
1724-5575
Volume 144
Issue 2
Start page 458
End page 462
Total pages 4
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
This paper presents an interdisciplinary approach to crop improvement that links physiology with plant breeding and simulation modelling to enhance the selection of high-yielding, drought-tolerant varieties. In a series of field experiments in Queensland, Australia, we found that the yield of CIMMYT wheat line SeriM82 ranged from 6% to 28% greater than the current cultivar Hartog. Physiological studies on the adaptive traits revealed that SeriM82 had a narrower root architecture and extracted more soil moisture, particularly deep in the profile. Results of a simulation analysis of these adaptive root traits with the cropping system model APSIM for a range of rain-fed environments in southern Queensland indicated a mean relative yield benefit of 14.5% in water-deficit seasons. Furthermore, each additional millimetre of water extracted during grain filling generated an extra 55 kg ha-1 of grain yield. Further root studies of a large number of wheat genotypes revealed that wheat root architecture is closely linked to the angle of seminal roots at the seedling stage - a trait which is suitable for large-scale and cost-effective screening programmes. Overall, our results suggest that an interdisciplinary approach to crop improvement is likely to enhance the rate of yield improvement in rain-fed crops. © 2010 Società Botanica Italiana.
Subjects 0703 Crop and Pasture Production
0706 Horticultural Production
Keyword Root chambers
Rooting Depth
Root-length Density
Soil Water Content
Stay-green phenotype
Water-scarce Environments
Cropping Systems Perspective
Simulation Capabilities
Water
Adaptation
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes A SELECTION OF PAPERS PRESENTED DURING THE 7TH ISSR SYMPOSIUM, ROOT RESEARCH AND APPLICATION (ROOT-RAP), 2–4 SEPTEMBER 2009

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 24 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 23 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 22 Aug 2010, 00:03:02 EST