Increasing milk production from forage: production systems and extension service preferences of the northern Australian dairy industry

Chataway, R. G., Barber, D. G. and Callow, M. N. (2010) Increasing milk production from forage: production systems and extension service preferences of the northern Australian dairy industry. Animal Production Science, 50 7: 705-713. doi:10.1071/AN09228

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Chataway, R. G.
Barber, D. G.
Callow, M. N.
Title Increasing milk production from forage: production systems and extension service preferences of the northern Australian dairy industry
Journal name Animal Production Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1836-0939
1836-5787
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AN09228
Volume 50
Issue 7
Start page 705
End page 713
Total pages 9
Place of publication Collingwood, Vic, Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Dairy farms in Queensland were stratified by six regions, three levels of enterprise size (0.25-0.69, 0.7-1.39 or >1.4 ML milk/year) and two rainfall zones (<1000 and >1000 mm/year). Thirteen percent of farmers (89 farms) were surveyed using a prepared questionnaire to ascertain the current production systems, forage management practices and preferences for extension services. Herd size, dairy area, milk production per cow, the use of cropping, pit silage, concentrate input and irrigation input all increased (P < 0.05) with larger enterprises. At the same time the stocking rate on high milk volume farms was almost twice that on smaller farms. The drier zone (<1000 mm/year) was associated with lower stocking rate, higher per cow production and a greater emphasis on cropping and feedpad usage (P < 0.05). The importance of enterprise growth through intensification of the existing farm land resource base is indicated through these findings. Apart from ration formulation, processes used to manage cropping land, irrigation and grazing were primarily based on tradition or intuition. In valuing extension activities, farmers across all enterprise sizes were in general agreement that information products warranted only a small investment. As enterprise size increased, a more individualised and focussed extension service, delivered through targeted discussion groups and personal coaches was favoured. © 2010 The State of Queensland.
Keyword Dairy farming
Sub-tropics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 15 Aug 2010, 00:07:59 EST