The multifunctional transition in Australia's tropical savannas: The emergence of consumption, protection and Indigenous values

Holmes, John (2010) The multifunctional transition in Australia's tropical savannas: The emergence of consumption, protection and Indigenous values. Geographical Research, 48 3: 265-280. doi:10.1111/j.1745-5871.2009.00629.x

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Author Holmes, John
Title The multifunctional transition in Australia's tropical savannas: The emergence of consumption, protection and Indigenous values
Journal name Geographical Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1745-5863
1745-5871
Publication date 2010-08
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1745-5871.2009.00629.x
Volume 48
Issue 3
Start page 265
End page 280
Total pages 16
Place of publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract As elsewhere in affluent, western nations, the direction, complexity and pace of rural change in Australia can be conceptualised as a multifunctional transition in which a variable mix of consumption and protection values has emerged, contesting the former dominance of production values, and leading to greater complexity and heterogeneity in rural occupance at all scales. This transition has been explored in accessible, high-amenity landscapes driven by enhanced consumption values. Less attention has been directed to remote, marginal lands where a flimsy mode of productivist occupance can, in part, be displaced by alternative modes with the transitions being facilitated by low transfer costs. Such is the case in Australia's northern tropical savannas where an extensive mode of pastoral occupance is selectively displaced by alternative consumption, protection and Indigenous values. This transition towards multifunctional occupance is most readily documented by mapping changes in land tenure and ownership over the last three decades. Tenure changes have been accompanied by new regimes of property rights and land ownership, including: native titles derived from common law; non-transferable, common-property Aboriginal freehold tenures; transfers of pastoral leases to Indigenous and conservation interests; expansion of conservation lands under public tenures; and revisions of the rights and duties of pastoral lessees. Future occupance scenarios remain unclear, given the sensitivity of this frontier zone to national and global driving forces. © 2009 The Author. Journal compilation © 2009 Institute of Australian Geographers.
Keyword Multifunctionality
Multifunctional transition
Rural occupance
Land tenure
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 3 December 2009

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2011 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 21 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 08 Aug 2010, 00:05:33 EST