A comparative analysis of the Integrated Development and Assessment Systems of NSW and Queensland on the basis of equity and efficiency

Crane, William (2003). A comparative analysis of the Integrated Development and Assessment Systems of NSW and Queensland on the basis of equity and efficiency PhD Thesis, T.C. Beirne School of Law, The University of Queensland.

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Author Crane, William
Thesis Title A comparative analysis of the Integrated Development and Assessment Systems of NSW and Queensland on the basis of equity and efficiency
School, Centre or Institute T.C. Beirne School of Law
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2003-02-14
Thesis type PhD Thesis
Total pages 394
Language eng
Subjects 15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services
360101 Australian Government and Politics
Formatted abstract At very few times in the past has Australian planning law been the subject of such concerted review by the Commonwealth and State governments and by increasingly active stakeholders from the environmental and development communities. Out of this review has emerged a climate of expectations about assessment systems and approval systems generally, which reflect an increasingly complex interplay between often-conflicting public and private aspirations. The desire, often expressed at Commonwealth and State levels, for the economy to become globally competitive, for growth rates to be maintained, for the external trade deficit to be in balance, for employment to be maintained at high levels requires, as a precondition, that an assessment and approval system be established and maintained which is transparent, flexible, and simple and which is based, conceptually, on notions of equity and efficiency.

In turn, these, essentially economic, expectations must increasingly be set against a strengthened perception that environmental factors must occupy centre-stage in any such system. These two sets of expectations, which often reflect quite differing philosophical, ethical and cognitive perceptions concerning the role of the state, the rights of various underprivileged groups, the debate over specificity or holism, the relative value to be placed on public consultation and participation and many other issues which will be considered subsequently, come into play in the development control portion of the overall planning process. In social and legal terms then, development control is often at the crossroads of competing principles such as the private right to use land, the public right to mitigate the consequences of that private right, mediation, negotiation and outright regulatory and statutory prescription. The intention of this work is examine two sophisticated IDAS systems in the context of their relative equity or fairness to all participants and their relative efficiency in procedural and economic terms.
Keyword Competition -- Australia.
Competition -- Government policy -- Australia.
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