On translating Wang Wei's poetic style: A comparative study from the perspectives of form, contents and emotions

Wang, Ting Ting (2010). On translating Wang Wei's poetic style: A comparative study from the perspectives of form, contents and emotions M.A. Thesis, School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, The University of Queensland.

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Author Wang, Ting Ting
Thesis Title On translating Wang Wei's poetic style: A comparative study from the perspectives of form, contents and emotions
School, Centre or Institute School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type M.A. Thesis
Supervisor Patton, Simon
Total pages 109
Language eng
Subjects L
970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
200323 Translation and Interpretation Studies
200311 Chinese Languages
Abstract/Summary Tang poetry represents the peak of poetic excellence in China. Its unique style has drawn the attention of readers, scholars and translators as well as caused heated debates on its translatability in academic circles. To dissect “style” into the three parts of form, contents and emotions proves to be a feasible way proposed by Cheng Fangwu. Wang Wei, having achieved the closest union with the natural world that has ever been expressed, is one of the leading poets of the High Tang and one of the best-loved Chinese poets in the West. When different translation versions of his poems are put together, it is obvious that Chinese, American and Australian translators look at the landscape and Buddhist serenity depicted from different perspectives. In this thesis, what the differences are and how the differences came into being will be discussed through a comparative study of four Wang Wei’s landscape poems, each translated by a Chinese translator, an American translator and an Australian translator respectively. Through both macroscopic and microscopic comparative studies, which part of “style” has been most emphasized and will be the most important in future translations can be figured out as well.
Keyword Wang Wei
Tang poetry translation
style
contents
form
emotions

 
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Created: Tue, 03 Aug 2010, 09:56:54 EST by Jo Grimmond on behalf of School of Languages and Comp Cultural Studies