Impact of order of movement on nerve strain and longitudinal excursion: A biomechanical study with implications for neurodynamic test sequencing

Nee, Robert J., Yang, Chich-Haung, Liang, Chung-Chao, Tseng, Guo-Fang and Coppieters, Michel W. (2010) Impact of order of movement on nerve strain and longitudinal excursion: A biomechanical study with implications for neurodynamic test sequencing. Manual Therapy, 15 4: 376-381. doi:10.1016/j.math.2010.03.001


Author Nee, Robert J.
Yang, Chich-Haung
Liang, Chung-Chao
Tseng, Guo-Fang
Coppieters, Michel W.
Title Impact of order of movement on nerve strain and longitudinal excursion: A biomechanical study with implications for neurodynamic test sequencing
Journal name Manual Therapy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1356-689X
1532-2769
Publication date 2010-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.math.2010.03.001
Volume 15
Issue 4
Start page 376
End page 381
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, United Kingdom
Publisher Churchill Livingstone
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract It is assumed that strain in a nerve segment at the end of a neurodynamic test will be greatest if the joint nearest that nerve segment is moved first in the neurodynamic test sequence. To test this assumption, the main movements of the median nerve biased neurodynamic test were applied in three different sequences to seven fresh-frozen human cadavers. Strain and longitudinal excursion were measured in the median nerve at the distal forearm. Strain and relative position of the nerve at the end of a test did not differ between sequences. The nerve was subjected to higher levels of strain for a longer duration during the sequence where wrist extension occurred first. The pattern of excursion was different for each sequence. The results highlight that order of movement does not affect strain or relative position of the nerve at the end of a test when joints are moved through comparable ranges of motion. When used clinically, different neurodynamic sequences may still change the mechanical load applied to a nerve segment. Changes in load may occur because certain sequences apply increased levels of strain to the nerve for a longer time period, or because sequences differ in ranges of joint motions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd
Keyword Median nerve
Biomechanics
Upper limb neurodynamic test
Brachial plexus provocation test
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 01 Aug 2010, 00:03:10 EST