Service encounter needs theory: a dyadic, psychosocial approach to understanding service encounters

Bradley, Graham L., McColl-Kennedy, Janet R., Sparks, Beverley A., Jimmieson, Nerina L. and Zapf, Dieter (2010). Service encounter needs theory: a dyadic, psychosocial approach to understanding service encounters. In Wilfred J. Zerbe, Charmine E. J. Hartel and Neal M. Ashkanasy (Ed.), Emotions and organizational dynamism (pp. 221-258) Bingley, United Kingdom: Emerald Group Publishing. doi:10.1108/S1746-9791(2010)0000006013

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ209269.pdf HERDC combined - not publicly available application/pdf 411.27KB 3

Author Bradley, Graham L.
McColl-Kennedy, Janet R.
Sparks, Beverley A.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Zapf, Dieter
Title of chapter Service encounter needs theory: a dyadic, psychosocial approach to understanding service encounters
Title of book Emotions and organizational dynamism
Place of Publication Bingley, United Kingdom
Publisher Emerald Group Publishing
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.1108/S1746-9791(2010)0000006013
Year available 2010
Series Research in Emotion in Organizations
ISBN 9780857241788
0857241788
9780857241771
085724177X
ISSN 1746-9791
Editor Wilfred J. Zerbe
Charmine E. J. Hartel
Neal M. Ashkanasy
Volume number 6
Chapter number 9
Start page 221
End page 258
Total pages 38
Total chapters 13
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subjects 150506 Marketing Theory
910403 Marketing
Abstract/Summary Interactions between customers and service providers are ubiquitous. Some of these encounters are routine, but many are characterized by conflict and intense emotions. This chapter introduces a new theory, service encounter needs theory (SENT) that aims to elucidate the mechanisms through which service encounter behaviors affect outcomes for customers and employees. Evidence is presented for the preeminence within these encounters of eight psychosocial needs, and propositions are advanced regarding likely antecedents to fulfillment and violation of these needs. Emotional experiences and displays are viewed as important consequences of need fulfillment and violation, as are numerous cognitive, behavioral, and health-related outcomes.
Formatted Abstract/Summary






Keyword Emotion Recognition
Conflicts
Service Providers
Customers
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Publication date 2 July 2010 1746-9791

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 20 Jul 2010, 15:07:11 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School