Morphometric and taphonomic analysis of granular ark (Anadara granosa) dominated shell deposits of Blue Mud Bay, northern Australia

Faulkner, Patrick (2010) Morphometric and taphonomic analysis of granular ark (Anadara granosa) dominated shell deposits of Blue Mud Bay, northern Australia. Journal of Archaeological Science, 37 8: 1942-1952. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2010.02.021

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Author Faulkner, Patrick
Title Morphometric and taphonomic analysis of granular ark (Anadara granosa) dominated shell deposits of Blue Mud Bay, northern Australia
Formatted title
Morphometric and taphonomic analysis of granular ark (Anadara granosa) dominated shell deposits of Blue Mud Bay, northern Australia
Journal name Journal of Archaeological Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-4403
1095-9238
Publication date 2010-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jas.2010.02.021
Open Access Status
Volume 37
Issue 8
Start page 1942
End page 1952
Total pages 11
Editor John P. Grattan
Karl W. Butzer
Richard G. Klein
Th. Rehren
Place of publication London, U.K
Publisher Academic Press
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Metrical analyses of complete mollusc shells have commonly been used to examine aspects of prehistoric mollusc demography, and by extension to investigate potential human exploitation of a variety of species. Recently it has been highlighted that several taphonomic processes, such as fragmentation, have the potential to introduce size bias into these archaeological samples, particularly towards smaller size classes, and thus the potential to significantly skew results of these metrical analyses. This is investigated here by deriving morphometric equations for the sand/mudflat bivalve Anadara granosa, a species prevalent in archaeological sites across northern Australia. A linear regression model based on a series of valve measurements, resulting in high coefficients of determination, demonstrates strong predictive power for size reconstruction. The effects of fragmentation on assemblages from two case study sites are then examined as a means of reviewing issues of differential size preservation, variation in mean valve size, and evaluating the strength of previous interpretations of intensive human exploitation in Blue Mud Bay. Based on these analyses it appears that A. granosa mean size is not significantly affected by fragmentation as other species described in the literature, and previous interpretations retain their validity.
© 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Shell midden
Shell mound
Morphometry
Anadara granosa
Northern Australia
Shell taphonomy
Molluscan evidence
Age calibration
Southern Africa
Human impacts
Exploitation
California
Record
Midden
Populations
Resources
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 18 Jul 2010, 00:05:41 EST