A sociocultural investigation of the diasporic experiences of Japanese wives in Japanese - Australian intermarriage families: A South East Queensland case study

Denman, Jared (2008). A sociocultural investigation of the diasporic experiences of Japanese wives in Japanese - Australian intermarriage families: A South East Queensland case study Honours Thesis, School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, The University of Queensland.

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s40067690_Thesis_Hons.pdf Jared Denman UQ:40067690 _Honours Thesis 2008 application/pdf 1.67MB 250
Author Denman, Jared
Thesis Title A sociocultural investigation of the diasporic experiences of Japanese wives in Japanese - Australian intermarriage families: A South East Queensland case study
School, Centre or Institute School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2008
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Nagata, Yuriko
Total pages 71
Language eng
Subjects L
970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
200209 Multicultural, Intercultural and Cross-cultural Studies
Abstract/Summary Research into Japanese residents, migrants and families in Australia, as well as the local ethnic community, has slowly accumulated in the last 20 years. With the exception of war brides, the diasporic experiences of Japanese partners married to Australians and settled locally are largely unaccounted for. Available statistical data is unable to provide a basic characterisation of contemporary Japanese-Australian intermarriage, though it appears certain that the wife in these unions tend to be Japanese. Discussions about Japanese lifestyle migration to Australia provide useful insight into likely aspects of such diasporic experiences, which include retaining Japanese citizenship, returning regularly to Japan, and maintaining social networks with their home communities. Work on intermarriage in general also highlights the promotion of language maintenance activities in intermarriage families. This study invited a small selection of four Japanese wives, together with their Australian husbands, to reflect upon and share their personal perspectives on the place of “Japaneseness” in their families. In the course of the interviews, it was recognised that the social networks the wives had established and maintained with local Japanese, and their home communities in Japan, were important backdrops to their diasporic experiences. Accordingly, this thesis explores the social networks these wives have formed with local and remote Japanese communities and how these have developed and changed over time. It examines their involvement in these networks and the apparent personal and instrumental motivations behind this. A further exploration of these motivations is undertaken on the topics of citizenship and language.
Keyword Japan
Diaspora
intermarriage
southeast Queensland
migration

 
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