Genetic variation among Helicoverpa armigera populations as assessed by microsatellites: A cautionary tale about accurate allele scoring

Weeks, A. R, Endersby, N. M, Lange, C. L, Lowe, A., Zalucki, M. P and Hoffmann, A. A (2010) Genetic variation among Helicoverpa armigera populations as assessed by microsatellites: A cautionary tale about accurate allele scoring. Bulletin of Entomological Research, 100 4: 445-450. doi:10.1017/S0007485309990460

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Author Weeks, A. R
Endersby, N. M
Lange, C. L
Lowe, A.
Zalucki, M. P
Hoffmann, A. A
Title Genetic variation among Helicoverpa armigera populations as assessed by microsatellites: A cautionary tale about accurate allele scoring
Formatted title
Genetic variation among Helicoverpa armigera populations as assessed by microsatellites: A cautionary tale about accurate allele scoring
Journal name Bulletin of Entomological Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-4853
1475-2670
Publication date 2010-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0007485309990460
Volume 100
Issue 4
Start page 445
End page 450
Total pages 6
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The existence of genetic differences among Australian populations of the pest moth Helicoverpa armigera based on microsatellite markers is contentious. To resolve this issue, we analyzed microsatellite variation in moth samples from multiple locations simultaneously in two laboratories that have previously reported contrasting patterns. Alleles and allele numbers detected in the laboratories differed, as did the genetic differences found between the samples. The automated scoring system used in one of the laboratories combined with non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels led to inaccurate identification of alleles and high FST values between the populations. However, H. armigera in Australia is probably not structured geographically, with high gene flow between populations. This influences management of H. armigera and the development of area-wide control options, as populations need to be considered as one panmictic unit. The results also highlight potential problems of automated scoring systems when these are not checked carefully.
Keyword Helicoverpa Armigera
Microsatellite
Genetic variation
Gene Flow
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 15 Jul 2010, 11:34:41 EST by Joni Taylor on behalf of School of Biological Sciences