Multicenter bronchiectasis study: A collaborative international study of bronchiectasis in Indigenous children

Singleton, Rosalyn, Redding, Gregory, Valery, Patricia, Chang, Anne, Mosley, Mehran, Pruitt, Lori, Jackson, Mary and Grimwood, Keith (2007). Multicenter bronchiectasis study: A collaborative international study of bronchiectasis in Indigenous children. In: 2nd International Meeting on Indigenous Child Health: Solutions, Not Problems, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, (). 20-22 April, 2007.


Author Singleton, Rosalyn
Redding, Gregory
Valery, Patricia
Chang, Anne
Mosley, Mehran
Pruitt, Lori
Jackson, Mary
Grimwood, Keith
Title of paper Multicenter bronchiectasis study: A collaborative international study of bronchiectasis in Indigenous children
Conference name 2nd International Meeting on Indigenous Child Health: Solutions, Not Problems
Conference location Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Conference dates 20-22 April, 2007
Publication Year 2007
Sub-type Poster
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background: Bronchiectasis still contributes to the high burden of respiratory disease in indigenous children worldwide.
The risk factors associated with progression to bronchiectasis, the clinical course and optimal treatment are not known. The
high rates of bronchiectasis among indigenous populations has led to the first collaborative international study (Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Island, New Zealand Pacific Island, Maori and Alaskan Native people). The aims of the Observational
study are to: (1) define the clinical course of chronic moist cough with or without infiltrates, and bronchiectasis; (2) identify
the risk factors associated with progression to bronchiectasis. The Australians are also conducting an Interventional study to
evaluate maintenance azithromycin (30 mg/kg once a week) compared to placebo on the prevention of pulmonary
exacerbations.
Methods The Observational study design is identical in the participating countries: a prospective cohort study (2005-2010)
of Indigenous children aged 6 months to 8 years with bronchiectasis or chronic moist cough. Primary outcomes are: number
and rate of pulmonary exacerbations and progression of radiologic findings.
Results: The study has started in all sites; to date 64 children have been enrolled (29 children in Alaska); we expect to
identify 100-150 eligible children. Participants have high rates of nasopharyngeal carriage with pneumococcus, H.
influenzae, and M. catarrhalis
Conclusions: This will be the first study to prospectively document the clinical course of chronic moist cough and
bronchiectasis in indigenous children. The clinical trial will provide critical information about the benefits and risks of
maintenance antibiotic treatment. The project has the potential to improve health outcomes for children with bronchiectasis
worldwide
Subjects 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Poster number: #12

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 30 Jun 2010, 15:56:44 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences