Protecting islands from pest invasion: optimal allocation of biosecurity resources between quarantine and surveillance

Moore, JL, Rout, TM, Hauser, CE, Moro, D, Jones, M, Wilcox, C and Possingham, HP (2010) Protecting islands from pest invasion: optimal allocation of biosecurity resources between quarantine and surveillance. Biological Conservation, 143 5: 1068-1078. doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2010.01.019


Author Moore, JL
Rout, TM
Hauser, CE
Moro, D
Jones, M
Wilcox, C
Possingham, HP
Title Protecting islands from pest invasion: optimal allocation of biosecurity resources between quarantine and surveillance
Journal name Biological Conservation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0006-3207
Publication date 2010-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.biocon.2010.01.019
Volume 143
Issue 5
Start page 1068
End page 1078
Total pages 11
Place of publication Essex, England
Publisher Elsevier Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract Removing pests from islands, and then keeping them pest free, is a common management goal. Given that goal we face a decision: how much effort should we invest in quarantine to reduce the risk of a pest arriving vs. surveillance, looking for the pest on the island with the view of eradicating it before it gets out of control. We use models of an island under threat of invasion by a pest (animal, plant or disease) and a cost minimisation approach to optimally allocate management resources between quarantine and surveillance. In the optimal allocations joint investment in both quarantine and surveillance is uncommon. Investment in quarantine is optimal if quarantine is more effective than surveillance or if large costs associated with pest impact and eradication are incurred at low pest density. Investment in quarantine is also favoured as our ability to eradicate a pest declines. Surveillance is optimal if it is considerably more cost-effective than quarantine and we can generate significant savings through early detection of the pest population. We illustrate how theses models are useful ways to examine these trade-offs by applying the model to the prevention of black rat (Rattus rattus) invasion on Barrow Island, Western Australia. Our model predicts an optimal strategy different to the management strategy currently being used on the island. We suggest that this is due to a risk-averse tendency in managers and the difficulty of estimating costs that combine management, environmental and social factors. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keyword Exotic species
Introduced species
Decision theory
Management
Stochastic dynamic program
Eradication
Costing Eradications
Biological Invasion
Barrier Zones
Prevention
Management
Plant
Risk
Australia
Bioeconomics
Complexities
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Received 20 November 2009; revised 21 January 2010; accepted 24 January 2010. Available online 20 February 2010.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Mathematics and Physics
Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 25 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 25 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 20 Jun 2010, 00:07:31 EST