Experimental evidence for the evolution of indirect genetic effects: Changes in the interaction effect coefficient, psi (ψ), due to sexual selection

Chenoweth, Stephen F., Rundle, Howard D. and Blows, Mark W. (2010) Experimental evidence for the evolution of indirect genetic effects: Changes in the interaction effect coefficient, psi (ψ), due to sexual selection. Evolution, 64 6: 1849-1856. doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.00952.x


Author Chenoweth, Stephen F.
Rundle, Howard D.
Blows, Mark W.
Title Experimental evidence for the evolution of indirect genetic effects: Changes in the interaction effect coefficient, psi (ψ), due to sexual selection
Journal name Evolution   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-3820
1558-5646
Publication date 2010-06-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1558-5646.2010.00952.x
Volume 64
Issue 6
Start page 1849
End page 1856
Total pages 7
Editor Barton, N.
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject C1
970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
0603 Evolutionary Biology
0604 Genetics
Formatted abstract
Indirect genetics effects (IGEs)—when the genotype of one individual affects the phenotypic expression of a trait in another—
may alter evolutionary trajectories beyond that predicted by standard quantitative genetic theory as a consequence of genotypic
evolution of the social environment. For IGEs to occur, the trait of interest must respond to one or more indicator traits in interacting
conspecifics. In quantitative genetic models of IGEs, these responses (reaction norms) are termed interaction effect coefficients and
are represented by the parameter psi (Ψ). The extent to which Ψ exhibits genetic variation within a population, and may therefore
itself evolve, is unknown. Using an experimental evolution approach, we provide evidence for a genetic basis to the phenotypic
response caused by IGEs on sexual display traits in Drosophila serrata. We show that evolution of the response is affected by
sexual but not natural selection when flies adapt to a novel environment. Our results indicate a further mechanism by which IGEs
can alter evolutionary trajectories—the evolution of interaction effects themselves.
© 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.
Keyword Cuticular hydrocarbons
Drosophila serrata
Experimental evolution
Interaction effect coefficient
Natural selection
Sexual selection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Brief Communication

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 20 Jun 2010, 10:06:42 EST