When the presumption of innocence is not beneficial: Periodic presumptive treatment for STIs and HIV in female sex workers

Murray, JM, Vallely, A and Page, A (2010) When the presumption of innocence is not beneficial: Periodic presumptive treatment for STIs and HIV in female sex workers. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 86 3: 161-162. doi:10.1136/sti.2009.040329


Author Murray, JM
Vallely, A
Page, A
Title When the presumption of innocence is not beneficial: Periodic presumptive treatment for STIs and HIV in female sex workers
Journal name Sexually Transmitted Infections   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1368-4973
Publication date 2010-06
Sub-type Editorial
DOI 10.1136/sti.2009.040329
Volume 86
Issue 3
Start page 161
End page 162
Total pages 2
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher B M J Group
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract The recent announcement that a prime-boost combination of two HIV vaccine candidates had a partial protective efficacy of around 31% in phase III clinical trials in Thailand is encouraging,but for the foreseeable future the prevention of HIV acquisition will continue to require a multifactorial response. In resource-poor countries where heterosexual transmission is the dominant mode of infection, the promotion of evidence-based behavioural and biomedical prevention strategies that effectively reach vulnerable individuals most at risk of HIV and sexually transmitted infections are paramount. Female sex workers (FSWs) and their clients may represent a significant source of new HIV infections, particularly in the early stages of the epidemic. Although 100% condom usage is the gold standard for HIV and STI risk reduction for FSWs and their clients, condoms are not always available, nor are they always used, due to women's limited ability to negotiate safer sexual practices in commercial or transactional relationships.
Keyword Sexually transmitted infection
Papua New Guinea
High prevalence
Prevention
Q-Index Code CX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Editorial
Collections: Australian Centre for International & Tropical Health
Non HERDC
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 20 Jun 2010, 00:01:05 EST