Females prefer athletes, males fear the disadvantaged: Different signals used in female choice and male competition have varied consequences

Wilson, Robbie S., Condon, Catriona H., David, Gwendolyn, FitzGibbon, Sean, Niehaus, Amanda C. and Pratt, Kirstin (2010) Females prefer athletes, males fear the disadvantaged: Different signals used in female choice and male competition have varied consequences. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277 1689: 1923-1928. doi:10.1098/rspb.2009.2196


Author Wilson, Robbie S.
Condon, Catriona H.
David, Gwendolyn
FitzGibbon, Sean
Niehaus, Amanda C.
Pratt, Kirstin
Title Females prefer athletes, males fear the disadvantaged: Different signals used in female choice and male competition have varied consequences
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
1471-2954
Publication date 2010-06-22
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2009.2196
Volume 277
Issue 1689
Start page 1923
End page 1928
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject C1
Formatted abstract
The most commonly assumed cost for exaggerated male ornamentation is increased predation pressure owing to decreased locomotor performance or increased conspicuousness to predators. Despite its intuitive basis, the locomotor costs of male ornamentation are not well established. We tested the hypothesis that multiple male signals that are used independently during female choice and male competition could lead to varied locomotor costs. Multiple signals with varied costs could provide a more detailed indicator of overall male quality, as only the highest-quality individuals could support all costs. To test this idea, we investigated the burst locomotor consequences of multiple ornaments for males of the pacific blue-eye (Pseudomugil signifer). We evaluated five competing models relating body size, ornament size and performance traits to field measures of dominance and attractiveness. Non-propulsive male fin ornaments used during male competition were different from those used in female choice. First dorsal fin length was the most important predictor of male attractiveness, while dominance was only associated with anal fin length. Furthermore, first dorsal fin length was positively correlated with swim speed, while anal fin length was negatively associated with speed. Our study shows that multiple male signals that are used independently during male competition and female choice also differ in their associated costs. This provides a mechanism for understanding why locomotor costs for exaggerated male ornamentation are not often empirically demonstrated.
© 2010 The Royal Society.
Keyword Burst swimming
Locomotor costs
Signals
Ornaments
Performance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 23 May 2010, 00:01:16 EST