Attention-like processes underlying optomotor performance in a Drosophila Choice Maze

van Swinderen, Bruno and Flores, Kristopher A. (2007) Attention-like processes underlying optomotor performance in a Drosophila Choice Maze. Journal of Neurobiology, 67 129-145. doi:10.1002/dneu.20334


Author van Swinderen, Bruno
Flores, Kristopher A.
Title Attention-like processes underlying optomotor performance in a Drosophila Choice Maze
Journal name Journal of Neurobiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1097-4695
0022-3034
Publication date 2007-02-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/dneu.20334
Volume 67
Start page 129
End page 145
Total pages 17
Place of publication New York , U.S.A
Publisher Wiley-Interscience
Language eng
Subject 1109 Neurosciences
0699 Other Biological Sciences
Abstract The authors present a novel paradigm for studying visual responses in Drosophila. An eight-level choice maze was found to reliably segregate fly populations according to their responses to moving stripes displayed on a computer screen. Visual responsiveness was robust in wild-type flies, and performance depended on salience effects such as stimulus color and speed. Analysis of individual fly choices in the maze revealed that stereotypy, or choice persistence, contributed significantly to a strain's performance. On the basis of these observations, the authors bred wild-type flies for divergent visual phenotypes by selecting individual flies displaying extreme stereotypy. Selected flies alternated less often in the sequential choice maze than unselected flies, showing that stereotypy could evolve across generations. The authors found that selection for increased stereotypy impaired flies' responsiveness to competing stimuli in tests for attention-like behavior in the maze. Visual selective attention was further investigated by electrophysiology, and it was found that increased stereotypy also impaired responsiveness to competing stimuli at the level of brain activity. Combined results present a comprehensive approach to studying visual responses in Drosophila, and show that behavioral performance involves attention-like processes that are variable among individuals and thus sensitive to artificial selection. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 67: 129-145, 2007
Keyword optomotor
selection
arousal
selective attention
behavior
stereotypy
local field potentials
novelty
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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