CO2 -driven hydrothermal eruptions in geothermal systems of Turkey

Uysal, I. Tonguç, Zhao, Jian-xin, Feng, Yue-xing and Golding, Suzanne D. (2009). CO2 -driven hydrothermal eruptions in geothermal systems of Turkey. In: Proceedings: Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. SGW 2009: 34th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford CA, U.S.A., (). 9-11 February 2009.

Author Uysal, I. Tonguç
Zhao, Jian-xin
Feng, Yue-xing
Golding, Suzanne D.
Title of paper CO2 -driven hydrothermal eruptions in geothermal systems of Turkey
Formatted title
CO2 –driven hydrothermal eruptions in geothermal systems of Turkey
Conference name SGW 2009: 34th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering
Conference location Stanford CA, U.S.A.
Conference dates 9-11 February 2009
Convener Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University
Proceedings title Proceedings: Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering
Place of Publication Red Hook, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Curran Associates
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781615673186
1615673180
Total pages 4
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Substantial CO2 degassing occurs from geothermal waters in Turkey as evident from ongoing deposition of recent terrace travertines and emplacement of significant travertine vein and breccia deposits representing hydrothermal eruption products. Geochemical data indicate rapid ascent of CO2- bearing fluids without significant interaction with basement and host rocks. High-precision U-series dates of most travertine veins coincide with times of cold/dry climate events. Late Quaternary climate variability controls the availability and quantity of geothermal waters, with relatively wet climate events (such as today) leading to CO2 discharge and dissipation at surface through deposition of terracemound travertines. We hypothesise that a significant reduction in surface or near surface discharge of CO2 by spring or geothermal waters during dry climate periods evidently promotes oversaturation of CO2 in deep reservoirs. It is concluded that host rock fracturing in response to seismic shaking and fluid overpressure results in rapid exsolution and expansion of the dissolved gas leading to hydrothermal eruptions.
Subjects 0403 Geology
970104 Expanding Knowledge in the Earth Sciences
E1
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Additional Notes Publication date: October 2009. Conference Proceedings Number: "SGP-TR-187".

 
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Created: Wed, 05 May 2010, 13:31:58 EST by Tracy Paroz on behalf of School of Earth Sciences