Is renal artery stenosis an under-recognised cause of chronic kidney disease?

Cooke, D. R., Thers, A. E., Robertson, I. K., Coombes, J. S. and Fassett, R. G. (2006). Is renal artery stenosis an under-recognised cause of chronic kidney disease?. In: 42nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology, Melbourne, Australia, (A47-A47). 14–18 August 2006. doi:10.1111/j.1440-1797.2006.00656.x


Author Cooke, D. R.
Thers, A. E.
Robertson, I. K.
Coombes, J. S.
Fassett, R. G.
Title of paper Is renal artery stenosis an under-recognised cause of chronic kidney disease?
Conference name 42nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian and New Zealand Society of Nephrology
Conference location Melbourne, Australia
Conference dates 14–18 August 2006
Publication Year 2006
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1111/j.1440-1797.2006.00656.x
ISSN 1320-5358
1440-1797
Volume 11 Suppl 2
Issue Supplement 2
Start page A47
End page A47
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background: The incidence of renal artery stenosis (RAS) is under-recognised
in the chronic kidney disease population. ANZDATA attributes 1% of ESRF to
renovascular disease. Elsewhere RAS as a cause of ESRD has been cited in 5–8%
of cases. In addition some studies have suggested RAS to be independently associated
with adverse cardiovascular events.
Methods: We undertook a prospective case series of patients presenting with
Stage 2 or greater chronic kidney disease (CKD) (eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73m2) and
significant atheromatous disease and/or risk factors for atherosclerosis, in whom
other causes of kidney disease had been excluded. MR angiography of the renal
arteries with gadolinium was performed in these patients.
Results: 61 patients were assessed over 18 months. The mean age was 72 (SD
9) years. The mean eGFR was 30 (13) ml/min/1.73m2. 30 patients (49%, 95%
CI 36–62%) had evidence of significant renal artery stenosis (>50% reduction in
luminal diameter) in one or both renal arteries. 10 patients (16%, 8–28%) had
bilateral renal artery stenosis. 10 patients (16%, 8–28%) had minor disease only
(<50% reduction in luminal diameter in one or both renal arteries) with only 21
patients (34%, 23–48%) having 2 normal arteries.
Conclusion: Significant renal artery stenosis is common in this population and
its incidence may be significantly underappreciated. Data from clinical trials currently
underway may help clarify the most appropriate management of this
common problem. Further studies assessing the contribution of atheromatous
renal artery disease to the increasing incidence of ESRF are indicated.
Subjects 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Keyword Renal artery stenosis
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes abstract number: 2544

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 04 May 2010, 15:32:18 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences