Interactive effects from self-reported physical and psychosocial factors in the workplace on neck pain and disability in female office workers

Johnston, V., Jull, G., Souvlis, T. and Jimmieson, N. L. (2010) Interactive effects from self-reported physical and psychosocial factors in the workplace on neck pain and disability in female office workers. Ergonomics, 53 4: 502-513. doi:10.1080/00140130903490692


Author Johnston, V.
Jull, G.
Souvlis, T.
Jimmieson, N. L.
Title Interactive effects from self-reported physical and psychosocial factors in the workplace on neck pain and disability in female office workers
Journal name Ergonomics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0014-0139
0421-3629
Publication date 2010-04
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/00140130903490692
Volume 53
Issue 4
Start page 502
End page 513
Total pages 12
Editor Roger Haslam
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study explored the interaction between physical and psychosocial factors in the workplace on neck pain and disability in female computer users. A self-report survey was used to collect data on physical risk factors (monitor location, duration of time spent using the keyboard and mouse) and psychosocial domains (as assessed by the Job Content Questionnaire). The neck disability index was the outcome measure. Interactions among the physical and psychosocial factors were examined in analysis of covariance. High supervisor support, decision authority and skill discretion protect against the negative impact of (1) time spent on computer-based tasks, (2) non-optimal placement of the computer monitor and (3) long duration of mouse use. Office workers with greater neck pain experience a combination of high physical and low psychosocial stressors at work. Prevention and intervention strategies that target both sets of risk factors are likely to be more successful than single intervention programmes. Statement of Relevance: The results of this study demonstrate that the interaction of physical and psychosocial factors in the workplace has a stronger association with neck pain and disability than the presence of either factor alone. This finding has important implications for strategies aimed at the prevention of musculoskeletal problems in office workers.
© 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Keyword Interaction of risk factors
Neck pain
Office workers
Randomised controlled trial
Risk factors
Musculoskeletal disorders
Upper-limb
Working population
Shoulder disorders
prospective cohort
Computer users
Follow-up
Symptoms
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Sun, 02 May 2010, 00:07:32 EST