Early hydrological monitoring of Cadia's instrumented trial waste rock dump

Rohde, Timothy K. and Williams, David J. (2009). Early hydrological monitoring of Cadia's instrumented trial waste rock dump. In: Conference Proceedings of the Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage. Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage, Skelleftea, Sweden, (1-12). 23-26 June 2009.

Author Rohde, Timothy K.
Williams, David J.
Title of paper Early hydrological monitoring of Cadia's instrumented trial waste rock dump
Conference name Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage
Conference location Skelleftea, Sweden
Conference dates 23-26 June 2009
Convener Bjorn Ohlander
Proceedings title Conference Proceedings of the Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage
Place of Publication Sweden
Publisher SveMin/INAP
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Understanding how rainfall infiltrates, is stored within and is transported through surface waste rock dumps is essential to predicting the release rates of mineral weathering products to the environment. Infiltration is commonly assumed to be 50% of annual rainfall. There are however a lack of field data to confirm this. Further, there is poor understanding of the fate of rainfall infiltration; the proportion that goes into storage within the dump and the proportion that emerges from the base of the dump as seepage. In addition, there is poor understanding of the size of rainfall event necessary to trigger base seepage and the time delay before base seepage emerges following the rainfall event, and how these parameters change as the dump wets-up. Waste rock dumps are heterogeneous in nature, with conventional end-dumping of waste rock from a tip head resulting in a base rubble zone, alternating angle of repose coarse and fine-grained layers within the dump, and a traffic-compacted top surface, creating highly non-uniform pore distributions and preferred flow paths. These preferred flow paths are likely to dominate the transport of water through the dump. A 15m high trial waste rock dump comprising potentially acid forming material has been constructed at Cadia Hill Gold Mine in New South Wales, Australia. It has been instrumented with two surface lysimeters and 24 base lysimeters to monitor infiltration through the top of the waste rock dump and base seepage beneath the top surface and the side slopes of the dump. The paper describes the design and construction of the trial dump and its instrumentation, and the results of the first 2 years and 8 months of monitoring to 1 September 2008.
Subjects E1
090501 Civil Geotechnical Engineering
849804 Management of Solid Waste from Mineral Resource Activities
Keyword Acid rock drainage
Evaporation
Infiltration
Lysimeters
Preferential flow
Runoff
Seepage
Storage
Unsaturated soil mechanics
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 28 Apr 2010, 16:40:32 EST by Jeannette Watson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering