Acid drainage management and closure design of a sulfidic tailings storage facility in a dry climate

Chapman, Peter J., Williams, David J., Rhode, Timothy K. and Ennor, Steve J. (2009). Acid drainage management and closure design of a sulfidic tailings storage facility in a dry climate. In: , Conference Proceedings of the Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage. Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage, Skelleftea, Sweden, (1-11). 23-26 June 2009.

Author Chapman, Peter J.
Williams, David J.
Rhode, Timothy K.
Ennor, Steve J.
Title of paper Acid drainage management and closure design of a sulfidic tailings storage facility in a dry climate
Conference name Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage
Conference location Skelleftea, Sweden
Conference dates 23-26 June 2009
Convener Bjorn Ohlander
Proceedings title Conference Proceedings of the Securing the Future and 8th International Conference on Acid Rock Drainage
Place of Publication Sweden
Publisher SveMin/INAP
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 12
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The conventional deposition of potentially acid forming sulfidic mine tailings as a slurry results in seepage, with the potential to contaminate surface and ground waters, particularly during deposition, and possibly post-closure. In a dry climate, tailings deposition can be cycled to largely evaporate excess water, and on closure the tailings may remain desiccated to the extent that incident rainfall will not result in continued acidic drainage and contamination of the surrounding environment. The purpose of any cover would then be to limit dust, promote some vegetation and improve aesthetics, rather than to shed rainfall runoff, which would result in a poor vegetative cover and erosion. To test this hypothesis, a trail tailings cell at a mine in arid Western Australia has been instrumented with moisture and suction sensors located on towers placed prior to tailings deposition. Tailings were deposited over 18 months, and the cycles of desiccation and rewetting were monitored by the in situ instrumentation. This paper describes the life cycle of tailings deposition and desiccation, the moisture and suction data collected during the deposition and desiccation phases, and addresses the potential for long-term acid drainage to occur post-closure and the design of a suitable cover system.
Subjects E1
090501 Civil Geotechnical Engineering
849804 Management of Solid Waste from Mineral Resource Activities
Keyword Cover
Deposition
Desiccation
Field monitoring
Moisture and suction sensors
Soil water characteristic data
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 28 Apr 2010, 16:06:49 EST by Jeannette Watson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering