Is smoking in pregnancy an independent predictor of academic difficulties at 14 years of age? A birth cohort study

O'Callaghan, Frances V., Mamun, Abdullah Al, O'Callaghan, Michael, Alati, Rosa, Williams, Gail M. and Najman, Jake M. (2010) Is smoking in pregnancy an independent predictor of academic difficulties at 14 years of age? A birth cohort study. Early Human Development, 86 2: 71-76. doi:10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2009.12.008

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Author O'Callaghan, Frances V.
Mamun, Abdullah Al
O'Callaghan, Michael
Alati, Rosa
Williams, Gail M.
Najman, Jake M.
Title Is smoking in pregnancy an independent predictor of academic difficulties at 14 years of age? A birth cohort study
Journal name Early Human Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-3782
1872-6232
Publication date 2010-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.earlhumdev.2009.12.008
Volume 86
Issue 2
Start page 71
End page 76
Total pages 6
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Studies of the effects of maternal smoking during pregnancy have reported inconsistent findings in relation to measures of offspring cognitive functioning. Few studies, however, have examined learning outcomes in adolescents, as opposed to IQ.

Aim: To examine the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and academic performance among adolescent offspring.

Study design: Population-based birth cohort study.

Subjects: 7223 mothers and children were enrolled in the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy in Brisbane (Australia) from 1981 to 1984. Analyses were restricted to the 4294 mothers and children for whom all information was reported at 14-year follow-up.

Outcome measures: Reports of academic performance of 14-year-old offspring in English, Science and Mathematics with different patterns of maternal smoking (never smoked, smoked before and/or after pregnancy but not during pregnancy, or smoked during pregnancy).

Results: Low academic achievement was more common only in those whose mothers had smoked during pregnancy. Effect sizes were, however, small. The adjusted mean difference in total learning score for smoking before and/or after pregnancy but not during pregnancy, and for smoking during pregnancy were−0.18 (−0.58, 0.22) and−0.40 (−0.69,−0.12). Similarly, the adjusted odds ratios were 0.9 (0.65, 1.24) and 1.35 (1.07, 1.70).

Conclusion: Maternal smoking during pregnancy is a preventable prenatal risk factor associated with small decrements in offspring academic performance that continue into adolescence.
Keyword Smoking
Pregnancy
Birth cohort
Adolescent
Learning
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Public Health Publications
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 25 Apr 2010, 00:05:25 EST