Fencing artificial waterpoints failed to influence density and distribution of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus)

Fukuda, Y, McCallum, HI, Grigg, GC and Pople, AR (2009) Fencing artificial waterpoints failed to influence density and distribution of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus). WILDLIFE RESEARCH, 36 6: 457-465. doi:10.1071/WR08122


Author Fukuda, Y
McCallum, HI
Grigg, GC
Pople, AR
Title Fencing artificial waterpoints failed to influence density and distribution of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus)
Formatted title
Fencing artificial waterpoints failed to influence density and distribution of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus)
Journal name WILDLIFE RESEARCH   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1035-3712
Publication date 2009-09-29
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/WR08122
Volume 36
Issue 6
Start page 457
End page 465
Total pages 9
Editor Stan Boutin
Andrea Taylor
Piran White
Place of publication Australia
Publisher CSIRO Publishing
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
060899 Zoology not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Provision of artificial waterpoints in Australian rangelands has resulted in an increase in the range and density of kangaroos. At high densities, kangaroos can inhibit vegetation regeneration, particularly in some protected areas where harvesting is prohibited. Fencing off waterpoints has been proposed to limit these impacts. Our aim was to determine whether fencing off waterpoints during a drought (when kangaroos would be especially water-limited) would influence the density and distribution of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus). Two waterpoints were fenced within the first 6 months of the 27-month study and a further two waterpoints were kept unfenced as controls in Idalia National Park, western Queensland. We estimated kangaroo densities around waterpoints from walked line-transect counts, and their grazing distribution from dung-pellet counts. Fencing off waterpoints failed to influence either the density or distribution up to 4 km from the waterpoints. Our results indicate that food availability, rather than the location of waterpoints, determines kangaroo distribution. Few areas in the rangelands are beyond kangaroos’ convenient reach from permanent waterpoints. Therefore, fencing off waterpoints without explicitly considering the spatial context in relation to other available water sources will fail to achieve vegetation regeneration.
Keyword NEW-SOUTH-WALES
NATIONAL-PARK
WATER SOURCES
WESTERN
HERBIVORES
PATTERNS
WILDLIFE
POINTS
RANGE
LANDS
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 12 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 23 Apr 2010, 15:37:08 EST by Joni Taylor on behalf of School of Biological Sciences