Indigenous mobility and the sustainability of communities: Case studies from Northwest Queensland and Eastern Northern Territory

Long, Stephen and Memmott, Paul (2009). Indigenous mobility and the sustainability of communities: Case studies from Northwest Queensland and Eastern Northern Territory. In: Ho, Goen, Mathaew, Kuruvilla and Anda, Martin, Sustainability of Indigenous Communities in Australia: Selected papers from the National Conference. Sustainability of Indigenous Communities in Australia: Selected papers from the National Conference, Murdoch University, Perth, (231-243). 12-14 July 2006.

Author Long, Stephen
Memmott, Paul
Title of paper Indigenous mobility and the sustainability of communities: Case studies from Northwest Queensland and Eastern Northern Territory
Conference name Sustainability of Indigenous Communities in Australia: Selected papers from the National Conference
Conference location Murdoch University, Perth
Conference dates 12-14 July 2006
Convener Murdoch University
Proceedings title Sustainability of Indigenous Communities in Australia: Selected papers from the National Conference
Place of Publication Perth, WA
Publisher Murdoch University
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 978-869059173, 0869059173
Editor Ho, Goen
Mathaew, Kuruvilla
Anda, Martin
Volume 1
Start page 231
End page 243
Total pages 13
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This paper is concerned with the relationship between Indigenous mobility and the sustainability of remote Indigenous communities in Australia. Indigenous people in remote and rural Australia are frequently moving between places. Such movement is a key to the maintenance of Indigenous relationships to places and to kin. This cultural maintenance continues despite a period of 100 years or more when the government employed strategies to disrupt traditional Aboriginal social and geographic patterns. Recently there have been renewed attempts by government to question the sustainability of remote Indigenous communities based on the economics of remote service provision. Given the widespread reporting of high mobility in the ethnographic and Indigenous housing literature, and the recent political call to reconsider the role of small-scale remote Aboriginal settlements, this paper addresses the need to understand both the role of mobility in sustaining and expressing the attachment of Indigenous people to their places and kin and the relationship between mobility and service needs. The paper examines case studies of the mobility of two remote Indigenous communities, Alpurrurulam in the eastern Northern Territory, and Dajarra in northwest Queensland. The paper outlines the implications of Aboriginal mobility for service provision in this study region. The paper reveals a policy challenge to balance the forces for continuity of remote and rural lifestyles, and those of changes in service needs and supplies.
Subjects E1
910102 Demography
169902 Studies of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Society
Keyword Indigenous mobility
Mobility regions
Travel
Services
Remote settlements
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Thu, 22 Apr 2010, 14:54:40 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of School of Architecture