Auditory displays in anesthesiology

Sanderson, Penelope M., Liu, David and Jenkins, Simon A. (2009) Auditory displays in anesthesiology. Current Opinion in Anesthesiology, 22 6: 788-795. doi:10.1097/ACO.0b013e3283326a2f


Author Sanderson, Penelope M.
Liu, David
Jenkins, Simon A.
Title Auditory displays in anesthesiology
Journal name Current Opinion in Anesthesiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0952-7907
Publication date 2009-12-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/ACO.0b013e3283326a2f
Volume 22
Issue 6
Start page 788
End page 795
Total pages 8
Editor Hugo van Aken
Paul G Barash
Place of publication United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
090303 Biomedical Instrumentation
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract Purpose of review: We outline and discuss recent work on auditory displays, covering both auditory alarms that indicate technical or physiological threshold levels and informative auditory displays that provide a continuous awareness of a patient's well being. Recent findings: The struggle to make auditory alarms informative proceeds with work on two fronts. In one approach, researchers are developing and evaluating auditory alarm displays to indicate the source and urgency of off-normal states and are relying on the emergence of smart software algorithms to reduce the false-positive rate. In a complementary approach, other researchers are providing information about the patient's well being in normal as well as abnormal states, generalizing the advantages of variable-tone pulse oximetry to other systems and other auditory display formats. In either approach, a multidisciplinary team is essential in the design and evaluation of auditory displays. Because informative auditory displays may subtly change clinical practice, there are repercussions for training. Summary: Auditory display in anesthesia can extend well beyond auditory alarms to displays that give the anesthesiologist a continuous peripheral awareness of patient well being. Much more rigorous approaches should be taken to evaluating auditory displays so they add information rather than noise.
Formatted abstract
Purpose of review
We outline and discuss recent work on auditory displays, covering both auditory alarms that indicate technical or physiological threshold levels and informative auditory displays that provide a continuous awareness of a patient's well being.
Recent findings
The struggle to make auditory alarms informative proceeds with work on two fronts. In one approach, researchers are developing and evaluating auditory alarm displays to indicate the source and urgency of off-normal states and are relying on the emergence of smart software algorithms to reduce the false-positive rate. In a complementary approach, other researchers are providing information about the patient's well being in normal as well as abnormal states, generalizing the advantages of variable-tone pulse oximetry to other systems and other auditory display formats. In either approach, a multidisciplinary team is essential in the design and evaluation of auditory displays. Because informative auditory displays may subtly change clinical practice, there are repercussions for training.
Summary
Auditory display in anesthesia can extend well beyond auditory alarms to displays that give the anesthesiologist a continuous peripheral awareness of patient well being. Much more rigorous approaches should be taken to evaluating auditory displays so they add information rather than noise.
Keyword auditory alarms
auditory displays
earcons
patient monitoring
sonification
ECOLOGICAL INTERFACE DESIGN
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT ALARMS
INTENSIVE-CARE-UNIT
SPEECH RECOGNITION
SONIFICATION
PERFORMANCE
INFORMATION
ATTENTION
CONTEXT
NOISE
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 21 Apr 2010, 00:43:58 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology