Effect of various processing techniques on digestibility of starch in red kidney bean (phaseolus vulgaris) and two varieties of peas (pisum sativum)

Eyaru, Richard, Shrestha, Ashok K. and Arcot, Jayashree (2009) Effect of various processing techniques on digestibility of starch in red kidney bean (phaseolus vulgaris) and two varieties of peas (pisum sativum). Food Research International, 42 8: 956-962. doi:10.1016/j.foodres.2009.06.007


Author Eyaru, Richard
Shrestha, Ashok K.
Arcot, Jayashree
Title Effect of various processing techniques on digestibility of starch in red kidney bean (phaseolus vulgaris) and two varieties of peas (pisum sativum)
Formatted title
Effect of various processing techniques on digestibility of starch in red kidney bean (phaseolus vulgaris) and two varieties of peas (pisum sativum)
Journal name Food Research International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0963-9969
Publication date 2009-06-18
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.foodres.2009.06.007
Volume 42
Issue 8
Start page 956
End page 962
Total pages 7
Editor A. Marangoni
Place of publication United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
820215 Vegetables
090805 Food Processing
Abstract The effect of common domestic processing methods, such as splitting, soaking, boiling and pressure-cooking on the nutritionally significant starch fractions such as rapidly and slowly digestible starches (RDS and SDS), resistant starch (RS) and total starch (TS) in two legumes, Red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Yellow and Green peas (Pisum sativum) were studied. The legumes had comparatively high amount (>30%, dry basis) of RS. Soaking of all legumes resulted in reduced starch fractions, possibly due to leaching of soluble fractions. Ordinary cooking of soaked as well as unsoaked seeds led to a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in RS and increase in RDS, SDS and TS. Pressure-cooking led to even greater reduction in RS and a greater increase in RDS. Cooking of legumes gelatinizes the starch and opens up the starch structure which makes them vulnerable to α-amylase hydrolysis. Splitting of legumes markedly affects the digestibility as well as RS content of raw as well as processed legumes indicating that the seed coat plays a key role in the digestibility of starches in these seeds. Overall, the enzyme resistant starch fraction of legumes was rendered more digestible by all the domestic cooking methods used.
Formatted abstract
The effect of common domestic processing methods, such as splitting, soaking, boiling and pressure-cooking on the nutritionally significant starch fractions such as rapidly and slowly digestible starches (RDS and SDS), resistant starch (RS) and total starch (TS) in two legumes, Red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and Yellow and Green peas (Pisum sativum) were studied. The legumes had comparatively high amount (>30%, dry basis) of RS. Soaking of all legumes resulted in reduced starch fractions, possibly due to leaching of soluble fractions. Ordinary cooking of soaked as well as unsoaked seeds led to a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in RS and increase in RDS, SDS and TS. Pressure-cooking led to even greater reduction in RS and a greater increase in RDS. Cooking of legumes gelatinizes the starch and opens up the starch structure which makes them vulnerable to α-amylase hydrolysis. Splitting of legumes markedly affects the digestibility as well as RS content of raw as well as processed legumes indicating that the seed coat plays a key role in the digestibility of starches in these seeds. Overall, the enzyme resistant starch fraction of legumes was rendered more digestible by all the domestic cooking methods used.
Keyword processing
digestibility
Resistant Starch
Pisum sativum
Phaseolus Vulgaris
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 18 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 20 Apr 2010, 14:24:59 EST by Emma Cushworth on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences