Enhancing quality of life for dogs and cats in confined situations

Timmins, R., Cliff, K., Day, C., Hart, B., Hart, L., Hubrecht, R., Hurley, K., Phillips, C., Rand, J., Rochlitz, I., Serpell, J. and Zawistowski, S. (2006). Enhancing quality of life for dogs and cats in confined situations. In: Proceedings of: UFAW / BVA Ethics Committee Symposium ‘Quality of Life – the Heart of the Matter’ The Royal Society, September 2006. UFAW / BVA Ethics Committee International Symposium Quality of Life: The Heart of the Matter, London, U.K., (). 13-14 September 2006.


Author Timmins, R.
Cliff, K.
Day, C.
Hart, B.
Hart, L.
Hubrecht, R.
Hurley, K.
Phillips, C.
Rand, J.
Rochlitz, I.
Serpell, J.
Zawistowski, S.
Title of paper Enhancing quality of life for dogs and cats in confined situations
Conference name UFAW / BVA Ethics Committee International Symposium Quality of Life: The Heart of the Matter
Conference location London, U.K.
Conference dates 13-14 September 2006
Proceedings title Proceedings of: UFAW / BVA Ethics Committee Symposium ‘Quality of Life – the Heart of the Matter’ The Royal Society, September 2006
Place of Publication Hertfordshire, U.K.
Publisher UFAW
Publication Year 2006
Abstract/Summary Although dogs and cats enjoy a special status in human households, many serve in roles that are not family-oriented. These animals live in research colonies, breeding kennels and catteries, humane shelters and other confined situations. An international panel of experts in the fields of canine and feline health, welfare and behaviour was asked to address two questions: (1) what defines quality of life for dogs and cats living in confined situations/conditions; (2) what additional research is needed in order to determine/establish how optimal quality of life can be achieved for these dogs and cats? This paper is a summary of the panel’s discussion. The panel began by exploring the current state of knowledge, focusing on the concepts of stress, pain, physical health and adoptability. The panel then reviewed factors that affect quality of life, including early experience, environmental enrichment, nutrition, exercise, social enrichment, and housing (light, ventilation, humidity, sound, temperature, etc.). Finally, the group considered what new questions needed to be answered in order to enhance quality of life for dogs and cats in confined living conditions. The panel agreed that the methodology for assessing quality of life required further refinement and standardization. It will be important to establish ‘baseline’ values for behavioural and physiological indices for cats and dogs in defined ‘ideal’ situations, and to standardize modifications of these indices in order to accommodate individual differences. The paper concludes with a number of specific research questions relevant to quality of life for dogs and cats in confinement.
Subjects 0799 Other Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences
Keyword Animal welfare
Cats
Dogs
Pets
Quality of life
Veterinary science
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Mon, 19 Apr 2010, 14:26:26 EST by Ms May Balasaize on behalf of Faculty Of Nat Resources, Agric & Veterinary Sc