Optical quantum computing: Science-fiction, horror-story or news

White, Andrew G. (2009). Optical quantum computing: Science-fiction, horror-story or news. In: Proceedings of the Australian Conference on Optics, Lasers and Spectroscopy. ACOLS/ACOFT 2009 Conference: Australasian Conference on Optics, Lasers and Spectroscopy and Australian Conference on Optical Fibre Technology in association with the International Workshop on Dissipative Solitons, Adelaide, SA, Australia, (259-259). 29 November-3 December 2009.

Author White, Andrew G.
Title of paper Optical quantum computing: Science-fiction, horror-story or news
Conference name ACOLS/ACOFT 2009 Conference: Australasian Conference on Optics, Lasers and Spectroscopy and Australian Conference on Optical Fibre Technology in association with the International Workshop on Dissipative Solitons
Conference location Adelaide, SA, Australia
Conference dates 29 November-3 December 2009
Convener Australian Optical Society
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Australian Conference on Optics, Lasers and Spectroscopy
Place of Publication Adelaide, SA, Australia
Publisher Australian Optical Society
Publication Year 2009
Sub-type Published abstract
ISBN 9781876346614
1876346612
Start page 259
End page 259
Total pages 1
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Quantum computing is the lovechild of quantum physics and computer science. In this talk we look at what quantum computation is, why physicists, chemists and computer scientists might want to do it, and where we are today. There are many possible physical architectures for realising a quantum computer, we will focus on optical quantum computing, where the information is encoded and manipulated using single photons. Formany years this was thought to be science-fiction, but with the discovery of measurement-induced nonlinearity there has been an explosion of interest world-wide, and a slew of ”firsts” in demonstration systems. Scaling up from these small systems to a large error-free computer is possible in principle: at first it was thought it would take horrific numbers of ”physical” gates per ”logical” gate. Recently proposed schemes reduce these overhead requirements from the order of 10,000 to 50, and possibly even 1 - great news if you’re an experimentalist! Finally, we will look briefly at some of the scientific and technological challenges ahead, and present our latest experimental results where we build a small optical quantum system for quantum chemistry, calculating the properties of molecular hydrogen to an accuracy of 20 bits.
Subjects E1
970102 Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
0206 Quantum Physics
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Mathematics and Physics
 
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Created: Fri, 16 Apr 2010, 14:35:56 EST by Jo Hughes on behalf of Physics