Oxidative stress associated with training for, and competing in an Ironman Triathlon

Knez, W. L., Coombes, J. S. and Jenkins, D. G. (2004). Oxidative stress associated with training for, and competing in an Ironman Triathlon. In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport.. 2004 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport Hot topics from the Red Centre, Alice Springs, Northern Territory, (18-18). 6-9 October 2004. doi:10.1016/S1440-2440(04)80091-4


Author Knez, W. L.
Coombes, J. S.
Jenkins, D. G.
Title of paper Oxidative stress associated with training for, and competing in an Ironman Triathlon
Conference name 2004 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport Hot topics from the Red Centre
Conference location Alice Springs, Northern Territory
Conference dates 6-9 October 2004
Proceedings title Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport.   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2004
DOI 10.1016/S1440-2440(04)80091-4
ISSN 1440-2440
Volume 7
Issue 4, Supplement 1
Start page 18
End page 18
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary The benefits of regular moderate exercise in reducing cardiovascular disease are well established. However, the effect of ultra-endurance exercise remains uncertain as aerobic exercise increases the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS produce oxidative stress and molecular damage. The present study investigated markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde (MDA)), antioxidant status (glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) and arterial stiffness; in a group of athletes training for and competing in an Ironman triathlon (3.8km swim, 180km ride, 42.2km run). Resting measures were taken between three and seven days prior to the triathlon (23 male, 6 female ultra-endurance triathletes [36.6 years]; and 29 matched controls [35.3 years] active < 180 minutes. week-l). Resting samples revealed the athletes had significantly lower MDA concentration (p<0.05) and higher activities of GPX and CAT (p<0.01 & 0.001 respectively) compared to controls. There were no differences between athletes and controls in measures of arterial stiffness or any other blood markers associated with antioxidant status. The amount of time spent exercise training was positively related to resting MDA concentration (r=0.37; p=0.05), resting SOD activity (r=0.57; p=0.001) and resting LDL concentration (r=0.38; p=0.04). Blood was again sampled within 15 minutes of finishing the race. Analysis found a significant increase in MDA concentration (p=0.03), decreases in the activities of GPX (p<0.001), CAT (p<0.001) and SOD) (p=0.001). In summary, although ultra-endurance athletes have lower oxidative stress during training, an Ironman triathlon results in a decrease in antioxidant capacity and an increase in oxidative stress.
Subjects 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Article number: 32

 
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Created: Fri, 16 Apr 2010, 09:46:44 EST by Laura McTaggart on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences