Mothers' experiences of sharing breastfeeding or breastmilk co-feeding in Australia 1978-2008

Thorley, Virginia (2009) Mothers' experiences of sharing breastfeeding or breastmilk co-feeding in Australia 1978-2008. Breastfeeding Review, 17 1: 9-18.

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Author Thorley, Virginia
Title Mothers' experiences of sharing breastfeeding or breastmilk co-feeding in Australia 1978-2008
Journal name Breastfeeding Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0729-2759
Publication date 2009-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 17
Issue 1
Start page 9
End page 18
Total pages 10
Editor Peta Harvey
Place of publication Melbourne, Australia
Publisher Australian Breastfeeding Association
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract While the concept of breastfeeding in contemporary Western culture is of a mother breastfeeding her own baby or babies, others have replaced the mother as provider of breastmilk, for a variety of reasons, through most periods of human existence. Existing policies for the sharing of this bodily fluid, milk, appear to have been written without the benefit of a detailed examination of the actual experiences of the mothers and babies involved. This study attempts to fill this information gap by investigating the sharing of breastfeeding or expressed breastmilk by Australian women in a recent thirty-year period, 1978-2008. The objective of this study was to explore the mothers' experiences of sharing breastfeeding or human milk including: the circumstances in which this bodily fluid was freely shared; what screening process, if any, was used before the milk of another mother was accepted; the mothers' feelings about the experience; the reported attitudes of others; and the children's behaviour when put to the breast of someone other than the mother. The underpinning reason for the sharing of breastfeeding or breastmilk was the desire of mothers to provide human milk to their babies, exclusively, including while they were absent or temporarily unable to breastfeed. Most mothers were selective about those with whom they would share breastfeeding or breastmilk.
Keyword Australia
Breastfeeding
Cross-nursing
Expressed breastmilk
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Thu, 15 Apr 2010, 10:39:26 EST by Felicia Richards on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry