Megastructure revisited: The Australian entries to the Plateau Beaubourg competition, 1970-1971

Holden, Susan (2009). Megastructure revisited: The Australian entries to the Plateau Beaubourg competition, 1970-1971. In: Julia Gatley, Cultural Crossroads: The 26th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference. Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference, Auckland, New Zealand, (1-21). 2-5 July 2009.

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Author Holden, Susan
Title of paper Megastructure revisited: The Australian entries to the Plateau Beaubourg competition, 1970-1971
Conference name Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Conference location Auckland, New Zealand
Conference dates 2-5 July 2009
Proceedings title Cultural Crossroads: The 26th Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand (SAHANZ) Annual Conference
Place of Publication Auckland, New Zealand
Publisher SAHANZ
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 9780473150655
0473150654
Editor Julia Gatley
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Held between December 1970 and June 1971, the international competition for the design of a Contemporary Art Complex on the Plateau Beaubourg in Paris that would eventuate in the Centre Pompidou, was significant for being the first international architecture competition held in France. The competition presented the problem of a new architectural type, and the question of the relationship between architecture and urbanism, both issues that had resonated throughout the 1960s in the megastructure movement. The critical notoriety and popular success of the Centre Pompidou has tended to overshadow the competition as an architectural event or as a framework through which to understand the building. The competition attracted 681 entries from 46 countries. Among these were six entries from Australia. An Australian entry by Ken Maher, Colin Stewart and Craig Burton was awarded among the top 30 schemes. It is significant for its lightweight structural expressionism, transparency and engagement with flexibility through a megastructural system, all themes that were evident in the winning entry by architects Richard Rogers, Renzo Piano, Gianfranco Franchini and John Young; and not typical of the manifestation of the megastructure movement in Australia at the time. This paper aims firstly to interrogate the significance of the competition for architectural history. It does this primarily through an analysis of the numerous megastructure entries. It considers the involvement of visual artists in the various groups active in making urban proposals in this period, thus proposing an aesthetic framework through which to understand the formal, spatial and temporal strategies evident in the megastructure entries in the competition and the completed Centre Pompidou. Secondly, this paper examines the Australian entries to the competition. It focuses on the premiated megastructure entry by Maher, Stewart and Burton and discusses the influences and Australian context surrounding their design.
Subjects E1
120103 Architectural History and Theory
970112 Expanding Knowledge in Built Environment and Design
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Tue, 13 Apr 2010, 10:22:30 EST by Deirdre Timo on behalf of School of Architecture