Systems/operational research and sustainable development: Towards a new agenda

Midgley, Gerald and Reynolds, Martin (2004) Systems/operational research and sustainable development: Towards a new agenda. Sustainable Development, 12 1: 56-64. doi:10.1002/sd.218


Author Midgley, Gerald
Reynolds, Martin
Title Systems/operational research and sustainable development: Towards a new agenda
Journal name Sustainable Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1099-1719
0968-0802
Publication date 2004-02
Year available 2003
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1002/sd.218
Volume 12
Issue 1
Start page 56
End page 64
Total pages 9
Place of publication Chichester, England
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Subject 1401 Economic Theory
1503 Business and Management
Abstract At the 2002 International Sustainable Development Research Conference in Manchester, a great number of the 53 papers presented addressed exciting methodological developments associated with action research. Many of these initiatives can be linked with the rich tradition of operational research (OR). OR and environmental planning for sustainable development share three traditions: first, both have wide boundaries in terms of clientele, range of methodological approaches used and attention to multiple (and often conflicting) values; second, both traditions have an interest in fostering interdisciplinarity; third, both OR and environmental planning are concerned with the implementation, as well as the design, of planning strategies. Given these shared traditions, we recently engaged in a systemic intervention project to explore the possibilities of improved collaboration between OR practitioners and environmental planners. In a literature review and interviews with stakeholders, three generic issues were found to recur: complexity and uncertainty (regarding the unpredictability of natural and social phenomena); multiple and often conflicting values (of those involved in environmental planning) and political effects (on those not involved in planning processes, including non-human nature). This paper reveals a pattern of how these generic issues are perceived in the public, business and voluntary sectors, and explains how, through a series of workshops and a mini-conference, three interrelated agendas for future action took shape. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Published Online: 30 Jul 2003

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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