Productive play 2.0: The logic of in-game advertising

Andrejevic, Mark (2009) Productive play 2.0: The logic of in-game advertising. Media International Australia, xx 130: 66-76.

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Author Andrejevic, Mark
Title Productive play 2.0: The logic of in-game advertising
Journal name Media International Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1329-878X
Publication date 2009-02
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume xx
Issue 130
Start page 66
End page 76
Total pages 11
Editor Sal Humphreys
Place of publication Brisbane
Publisher School of EMSAH and the Centre for Critical Studies, The University of Queensland
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
950204 The Media
200204 Cultural Theory
Abstract Online video games are helping to pioneer the use of interactive advertising that targets consumers based on information about their behaviour, consumption patterns, and other demographic and psychographic information. This article draws on the example of in-game ads to explore some of the ways in which advertisers harness virtual worlds to marketing imperatives, and equate realism and authenticity with the proliferation of commercial messages. Since video games have the potential to serve as a model for other forms of marketing both online and off, the way in which they are being used to exploit interactivity as a form of commercial monitoring has broader implications for the digital economy.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 09 Apr 2010, 08:46:15 EST by Fergus Grealy on behalf of Centre for Critical and Cultural Studies