Mood and creativity; A mood-regulation perspective moderated by goal orientation

To, M. L., Rowe, P. A. and Fisher, C. D. (2009). Mood and creativity; A mood-regulation perspective moderated by goal orientation. In: George Solomon, 2009 Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings. 2009 Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, (). 7-11 August, 2009.


Author To, M. L.
Rowe, P. A.
Fisher, C. D.
Title of paper Mood and creativity; A mood-regulation perspective moderated by goal orientation
Conference name 2009 Academy of Management Annual Meeting
Conference location Chicago, IL
Conference dates 7-11 August, 2009
Proceedings title 2009 Academy of Management Annual Meeting Proceedings
Place of Publication 2009 online program
Publisher Academy of Management
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor George Solomon
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Following decades of research inquiry, it has become clear that mood is a key predictor of creativity. Nonetheless, controversy remains as to why moods can lead to creativity, resulting in conflicting perspectives on whether positive and negative mood foster or inhibit creativity. In the present paper, we set out a new perspective to explain the mood-creativity link, which we call ¡§creativity-as-mood-regulation¡¨. Specifically, we propose that an employee experiencing moods chooses to engage in creativity in the hope to regulate moods, i.e., to remedy negative moods or to sustain positive moods. That is, without the expectancy that his or her mood state will be modified towards a desired state through being creative, the employee will be less likely to engage in creativity. We theorize further that this creativity-as-mood-regulation perspective is contingent upon an individual¡¦s goal orientation. The reason is that dispositional factors in different goal orientations can influence whether employees seek out or avoid engaging in creativity to regulate moods. If this proposed perspective is correct, we contributes to reconciliation of the controversy surrounding the mood-creativity link by identifying the specific goal-orientation conditions under which positive and negative moods can facilitate and prevent creativity. Implications for theory and research design are discussed.
Subjects 150311 Organisational Behaviour
910402 Management
EX
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 07 Apr 2010, 15:43:46 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School