Distributed Prospective Memory: An approach to understanding how nurses remember tasks

Grundgeiger, T., Sanderson, P.M., MacDougall, H.G. and Venkatesh, B.V. (2009). Distributed Prospective Memory: An approach to understanding how nurses remember tasks. In: William S. Marras, Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergnonomics Society 53rd Annual Meeting - 2009. Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 53rd Annual Meeting, San Antonio, Texas, USA, (759-763). 19-23 October 2009.

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Author Grundgeiger, T.
Sanderson, P.M.
MacDougall, H.G.
Venkatesh, B.V.
Title of paper Distributed Prospective Memory: An approach to understanding how nurses remember tasks
Conference name Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 53rd Annual Meeting
Conference location San Antonio, Texas, USA
Conference dates 19-23 October 2009
Convener Cheryl A. Bolstad
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergnonomics Society 53rd Annual Meeting - 2009   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication United States
Publisher Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Publication Year 2009
Year available 2009
Sub-type Fully published paper
Open Access Status
ISBN 978-0-945289-36-4
ISSN 1071-1813
Editor William S. Marras
Volume 53
Start page 759
End page 763
Total pages 5
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Abstract/Summary People’s ability to execute future intentions, or their prospective memory (PM), is a critical aspect of cognitive work because failures can have adverse outcomes. Most research to date deals with unaided prospective memory performance outside a healthcare context. We report results from a field study investigating PM performance of intensive care nurses. Concepts from distributed cognition help to identify how nurses use physical properties of their working environment to manage PM demands. Results show that (1) PM demands can be classified using a taxonomy from aviation and (2) nurses are supported by and use properties of the environment to manage PM demands. Focusing on distributed support for prospective memory lets us study prospective memory in rich work contexts. The results inform health information system and device design and professional education.
Subjects E1
1799 Other Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

 
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Created: Wed, 07 Apr 2010, 13:42:57 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology