Are stepsiblings bad, stepmothers wicked, and stepfathers evil? An assessment of Australian stepfamily stereotypes

Planitz, Judith M. and Feeney, Judith A. (2009) Are stepsiblings bad, stepmothers wicked, and stepfathers evil? An assessment of Australian stepfamily stereotypes. Journal of Family Studies, 15 1: 82-97. doi:10.5172/jfs.327.15.1.82


Author Planitz, Judith M.
Feeney, Judith A.
Title Are stepsiblings bad, stepmothers wicked, and stepfathers evil? An assessment of Australian stepfamily stereotypes
Journal name Journal of Family Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1322-9400
1839-3543
Publication date 2009-04
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5172/jfs.327.15.1.82
Volume 15
Issue 1
Start page 82
End page 97
Total pages 16
Editor Lawrie Moloney
Liz Morrison
Place of publication Maleny, Qld, Australia
Publisher eContent Management
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
97 Expanding Knowledge
Abstract Prior research has suggested that stepfamilies are perceived (or stereotyped) negatively in relation to intact families. The present studies examined contemporary stereotypes of Australian stepfamilies, using participants from stepfamilies and from biological (intact) families. Participants completed a comprehensive set of measures assessing key aspects of family interaction and family functioning (including lay concepts of stepfamilies and biological families, perceptions of conflict behaviour, semantic differentials, perceived satisfaction), to determine the extent of stereotyping. Quantitative and short-response analyses revealed a persistent negative stereotype of stepfamilies that was shared by members of stepfamilies themselves, and highlighted specific themes that characterise the stereotype. Results are discussed in terms of dominant theoretical perspectives, and implications for practitioners and those in stepfamilies. These studies address the limited literature on stepfamily stereotypes in Australia.
Keyword stereotypes
stepfamilies
young adults
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 06 Apr 2010, 10:57:21 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology