The genetics and ecology of reinforcement: Implications for the evolution of prezygotic isolation in sympatry and beyond

Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel, Grealy, Alicia and Nosil, Patrik (2009) The genetics and ecology of reinforcement: Implications for the evolution of prezygotic isolation in sympatry and beyond. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1168 156-182. doi:10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.04919.x


Author Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel
Grealy, Alicia
Nosil, Patrik
Title The genetics and ecology of reinforcement: Implications for the evolution of prezygotic isolation in sympatry and beyond
Journal name Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0077-8923
1749-6632
ISBN 9781573317542
Publication date 2009-06-24
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2009.04919.x
Volume 1168
Start page 156
End page 182
Total pages 27
Editor Douglas Braaten
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley - Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 060411 Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classified
Formatted abstract
Reinforcement, the evolution of prezygotic reproductive barriers by natural selection in response to maladaptive hybridization, is one of the most debated processes in speciation. Critics point to "fatal" conceptual flaws for sympatric evolution of prezygotic isolation, but recent theoretical and empirical work on genetics and ecology of reinforcement suggests that such criticisms can be overcome. New studies provide evidence for reinforcement in frogs, fish, insects, birds, and plants. While such evidence lays to rest the argument over reinforcement's existence, our understanding remains incomplete. We lack data on (1) the genetic basis of female preferences and the links between genetics of pre- and postzygotic isolation, (2) the ecological basis of reproductive isolation, (3) connections between prezygotic isolation between species and within-species sexual selection (potentially leading to a "cascade" of effects on reproductive isolation), (4) the role of habitat versus mate preference in reinforcement, and (5) additional detailed comparative studies. Here, we review data on these issues and highlight why they are important for understanding speciation.
Keyword Speciation
Reinforcement
Reproductive isolation
Female preferences
Assortative mating
Genetic incompatibilities
Natural selection
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 30 Mar 2010, 12:27:49 EST by Joni Taylor on behalf of School of Biological Sciences