Why bother to 'downshift'? The characteristics and satisfaction of downshifters in the Brisbane-South East Queensland region, Australia

Chhetri, Prem, Khan, Asad, Stimson, Robert and Western, John (2009) Why bother to 'downshift'? The characteristics and satisfaction of downshifters in the Brisbane-South East Queensland region, Australia. Journal of Population Research, 26 1: 51-72. doi:10.1007/s12546-008-9005-y


Author Chhetri, Prem
Khan, Asad
Stimson, Robert
Western, John
Title Why bother to 'downshift'? The characteristics and satisfaction of downshifters in the Brisbane-South East Queensland region, Australia
Journal name Journal of Population Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1443-2447
1835-9469
Publication date 2009-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12546-008-9005-y
Volume 26
Issue 1
Start page 51
End page 72
Total pages 22
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
910102 Demography
160399 Demography not elsewhere classified
Abstract Using the data collected as part of a Quality of Life (QoL) survey in the Brisbane-South East Queensland region (SEQ) of Australia, this paper examines differences in satisfaction levels between downshifters and non-downshifters, and identifies socio-economic predictors of the downshifting phenomenon. Almost 30% of survey respondents are classified as downshifters. Multivariate Analysis of Covariance reveals significant differences between downshifters and non-downshifters in a number of life-satisfaction domains, although the degree to which they were satisfied with their life before downshifting is unknown. Analysis of Covariance shows that downshifters reported a significantly lower level of satisfaction than non-downshifters, especially with respect to satisfaction with the amount of money available to them, independence or freedom, and employment. Multivariate logistic regression analysis reveals that post-secondary education and employment were positively associated with downshifting, while age was significantly associated with downshifting. It is argued that if downshifting is associated with lower levels of satisfaction, intervention may be required to initiate programs to engage downshifters more fully in the workforce by facilitating more flexible work arrangements and an improved working environment.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
ERA 2012 Admin Only
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 30 Mar 2010, 02:24:11 EST by Meredith Downes on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences