Four decades of complaints to a State Medical Board about graduates from one medical school: Implications for change in self-regulation processes

Parker, Malcolm, Zhang, Jianzhen, Wilkinson, David and Peterson, Raymond (2010) Four decades of complaints to a State Medical Board about graduates from one medical school: Implications for change in self-regulation processes. Journal of Law and Medicine, 17 4: 493-501.

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Author Parker, Malcolm
Zhang, Jianzhen
Wilkinson, David
Peterson, Raymond
Title Four decades of complaints to a State Medical Board about graduates from one medical school: Implications for change in self-regulation processes
Journal name Journal of Law and Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1320-159X
Publication date 2010-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 17
Issue 4
Start page 493
End page 501
Total pages 9
Editor Malcolm Parker
Place of publication North Ryde, NSW, Australia
Publisher Law Book Company
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Subject C1
92 Health
11 Medical and Health Sciences
Formatted abstract
In the context of the impending national registration of health practitioners in Australia including doctors, this column describes the types and patterns of complaints to a State Medical Board across an extended period, about graduates from one medical school. De-identified data concerning complaints about medical practitioners who had graduated from the University of Queensland, made to the Medical Board of Queensland between 1968 and 2006, were analysed. The main outcome measures were category of complaint, total complaint rate per doctor-year, frequency of complaints per practitioner and outcomes of complaints. There were 12 categories of complaints, encompassing different aspects of clinical management, impairment and unethical conduct. Outcomes included "no further action", a hierarchy of recommendations and conditions on registration, suspension, deregistration, health assessment, or referral to alternative bodies. Complaints predominantly related to clinical standards, and this also applied to those who attracted multiple complaints. Most cases were managed without resort to sanctions of any kind. Sanctions may be underutilised, particularly in cases of apparent recalcitrance. Improved tracking and appropriate reeducation and disciplinary measures will assist in better protecting the public under the new national registration arrangements.
Keyword Self-regulation processes
State Medical Board
National registration
Complaints
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published under "Bioethical issues".

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 29 Mar 2010, 13:38:07 EST by Jon Stekhoven on behalf of School of Medicine