Scouting and St John Ambulance Australia: Baden-Powell's advocacy for first aid and life-saving - a perspective in the Centenary Year of Scouting

Pearn, John H. (2008). Scouting and St John Ambulance Australia: Baden-Powell's advocacy for first aid and life-saving - a perspective in the Centenary Year of Scouting. In: Annual Scientific Meeting of the St John Ambulance Australia Historical Society, Adelaide, Australia, (). June 2008.

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Author Pearn, John H.
Title of paper Scouting and St John Ambulance Australia: Baden-Powell's advocacy for first aid and life-saving - a perspective in the Centenary Year of Scouting
Conference name Annual Scientific Meeting of the St John Ambulance Australia Historical Society
Conference location Adelaide, Australia
Conference dates June 2008
Convener St John Ambulance Australia Historical Society
Publication Year 2008
Year available 2010
Sub-type Other
Open Access Status
Total pages 17
Language eng
Abstract/Summary In 1908, Lieutenant General Robert Baden-Powell published Scouting for Boys and established the Boy Scouts, which within a decade had grown to be the largest youth organisation in the world. So it remains today. Scouting for Boys contained 28 "Camp Fire Yarns", of which three were incorporated in the chapter entitled "Saving Life; Or, How to Deal with Accidents". Thirty years previously, Surgeon Major Peter Shepherd (1841-1878) and Colonel Francis Duncan (1836-1888) had introduced the first civilian First Aid training for adults, conducted in segregated classes held at the Presbyterian Church Hall near the Woolwich Arsenal in London. Baden-Powell adopted these concepts and promoted both the chivalric heritage (inherent in the Order of St John) and its pragmatic teaching of the drills and skills of First Aid, incorporating these themes into the broader curriculum of Scouting. He promoted the teaching of First Aid as part of his broader ethos that one could be an optimal citizen, albeit as a child or youth, if one could "Be Prepared" both by prior training and knowledge; and by the maintenance of personal fitness, to help others. Shepherd and Duncan's pioneering St John advocacy was to bring the hitherto exclusively-military drills and skills of First Aid to the civilian adult population. Baden-Powell further extended what had been a novel, if not radical concept, to include boys and male youths. This pioneering advocacy was one specific example of his broader promotion of training in rescue, resuscitation and pre-hospital care that would enable youths to "Be Prepared" to deal with emergencies encountered in the prehospital scene. Many of the First Aid techniques which Baden-Powell proposed have changed; and many accident risks, such as runaway horses in the streets of towns and bites by rabid dogs, commonplace in his day, have disappeared. Nevertheless, his general principles of training for safety and rescue, accident site control, the seeking of counselling for depressed or suicidal victims and the hands-on skills to treat common injuries remain true today. This paper is a perspective audit of an important milestone on the road to widespread community training of essential life-saving and resuscitation skills.
Subjects 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
210399 Historical Studies not elsewhere classified
210304 Biography
Keyword first aid
life-saving
scouts
history
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 29 Mar 2010, 10:08:52 EST by Ms Marianne Sato on behalf of Herston Health Sciences Library