Intravenous versus oral iron supplementation for correction of post-transplant anaemia in renal transplant patients

Mudge, David, Tan, Ken-Soon, Miles, Rhianna, Johnson, David W., Campbell, Scott, Hawley, Carmel M., Isbel, Nicole M., Van Eps, Carolyn and Nicol, David L. (2009) Intravenous versus oral iron supplementation for correction of post-transplant anaemia in renal transplant patients. BMC Nephrology, 10 14.1-14.3. doi:10.1186/1471-2369-10-14

Author Mudge, David
Tan, Ken-Soon
Miles, Rhianna
Johnson, David W.
Campbell, Scott
Hawley, Carmel M.
Isbel, Nicole M.
Van Eps, Carolyn
Nicol, David L.
Title Intravenous versus oral iron supplementation for correction of post-transplant anaemia in renal transplant patients
Journal name BMC Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2369
Publication date 2009-06-06
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2369-10-14
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Start page 14.1
End page 14.3
Total pages 3
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject 920199 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) not elsewhere classified
110312 Nephrology and Urology
Abstract Background Post-transplant anaemia remains a common problem after kidney transplantation, with an incidence ranging from nearly 80% at day 0 to about 25% at 1 year. It has been associated with poor graft outcome, and recently has also been shown to be associated with increased mortality. Our transplant unit routinely administers oral iron supplements to renal transplant recipients but this is frequently accompanied by side effects, mainly gastrointestinal intolerance. Intravenous iron is frequently administered to dialysis patients and we sought to investigate this mode of administration in transplant recipients after noticing less anaemia in several patients who had received intravenous iron just prior to being called in for transplantation. Methods This study is a single-centre, prospective, open-label, randomised, controlled trial of oral versus intravenous iron supplements in renal transplant recipients and aims to recruit approximately 100 patients over a 12-month period. Patients will be randomised to receive a single dose of 500 mg iron polymaltose (intravenous iron group) or 2 ferrous sulphate slow-release tablets daily (oral iron group). The primary outcome is time to normalisation of haemoglobin post-transplant. Prospective power calculations have indicated that a minimum of 48 patients in each group would have to be followed up for 3 months in order to have a 90% probability of detecting a halving of the time to correction of haemoglobin levels to ≥110 g/l in iron-treated patients, assuming an α of 0.05. All eligible adult patients undergoing renal transplantation at the Princess Alexandra Hospital will be offered participation in the trial. Exclusion criteria will include iron overload (transferrin saturation >50% or ferritin >800 μg/l), or previous intolerance of either oral or intravenous iron supplements. Discussion If the trial shows a reduction in the time to correction of anaemia with intravenous iron or less side effects than oral iron, then intravenous iron may become the standard of treatment in this patient group.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article # 14

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Medicine Publications
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Created: Fri, 26 Mar 2010, 10:18:12 EST by Denise Wilson on behalf of Medicine - Princess Alexandra Hospital