Muscle power is related to tibial bone strength in older women

Ashe, M. C., Liu-Ambrose, T. Y. L., Cooper, D. M. L., Khan, K. M. and McKay, H. A. (2008) Muscle power is related to tibial bone strength in older women. Osteoporosis International, 19 12: 1725-1732. doi:10.1007/s00198-008-0655-6


Author Ashe, M. C.
Liu-Ambrose, T. Y. L.
Cooper, D. M. L.
Khan, K. M.
McKay, H. A.
Title Muscle power is related to tibial bone strength in older women
Journal name Osteoporosis International   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0937-941X
1433-2965
Publication date 2008-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00198-008-0655-6
Volume 19
Issue 12
Start page 1725
End page 1732
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, U.K.
Publisher Springer International
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
1106 Human Movement and Sports Science
Formatted abstract
Summary  We enrolled 65 to 75 year-old community-dwelling women and measured muscle power, strength, physical activity using accelerometry and tibial bone strength using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Muscle power contributed 6.6% of the variance in the bone strength–strain index and 8.9% in the section modulus after accounting for age, height, weight, and physical activity; moderate to vigorous physical activity was related to muscle power in the lower extremity.Introduction  Muscle power is associated with DXA measurements of bone mass, but it is not known whether muscle power is associated with bone strength. There are no reports of investigations that have tested the effect of muscle power on bone compartments using advanced imaging.Methods  We enrolled 74 community-dwelling women aged 65–75 years. We measured muscle power and strength of leg extension using Keiser air-pressure resistance equipment. All participants wore a waist-mounted Actigraph accelerometer to record physical activity. We used peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to measure tibial mid-shaft (50% of the site) bone strength (strength–strain index, section modulus). We used Pearson correlations and multi-level linear regression to investigate the associations between muscle and bone.Results  Muscle power contributed 6.6% (p = 0.007) of the variance in the bone strength–strain index and 8.9% (p = 0.001) the variance in the section modulus in older women after accounting for age, height, weight, and physical activity. Moderate to vigorous physical activity was significantly related to muscle power in the lower extremity (r = 0.260; p = 0.041).Conclusion  Muscle power significantly contributed to the variance in estimated bone strength. Whether power training will prove to be a more effective stimulus for bone strength than conventional strength training will require further studies.
Keyword Accelerometry
Bone strength
Muscle power
Muscle strength
pQCT
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 26 Mar 2010, 08:30:24 EST by Ms May Balasaize on behalf of Faculty Of Health Sciences