Orthographic influences in spoken-word recognition: The consistency effect in semantic and gender categorization tasks

Peereman, Ronald, Dufour, Sophie and Burt, Jennifer S. (2009) Orthographic influences in spoken-word recognition: The consistency effect in semantic and gender categorization tasks. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16 2: 363-368. doi:10.3758/PBR.16.2.363


Author Peereman, Ronald
Dufour, Sophie
Burt, Jennifer S.
Title Orthographic influences in spoken-word recognition: The consistency effect in semantic and gender categorization tasks
Journal name Psychonomic Bulletin & Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1069-9384
Publication date 2009-04
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3758/PBR.16.2.363
Volume 16
Issue 2
Start page 363
End page 368
Total pages 6
Editor Robert M Nosofsky
Place of publication United States
Publisher Psychonomic Society, Inc.
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Subject C1
160201 Causes and Prevention of Crime
170204 Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension)
97 Expanding Knowledge
Abstract According to current models, spoken word recognition is driven by the phonological properties of the speech signal. However, several studies have suggested that orthographic information also influences recognition in adult listeners. In particular, it has been repeatedly shown that, in the lexical decision task, words that include rimes with inconsistent spellings (e.g., /-ip/ spelled -eap or -eep) are disadvantaged, as compared with words with consistent rime spelling. In the present study, we explored whether the orthographic consistency effect extends to tasks requiring people to process words beyond simple lexical access. Two different tasks were used: semantic and gender categorization. Both tasks produced reliable consistency effects. The data are discussed as suggesting that orthographic codes are activated during word recognition, or that the organization of phonological representations of words is affected by orthography during literacy acquisition.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: 2010 Higher Education Research Data Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 25 Mar 2010, 15:53:20 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology